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401(k)s are just too darn confusing

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By Walter Hamilton
Los Angeles Times
Published:
Americans know that 401(k) retirement plans are important, but they spend only a moderate time researching investments and are often confused about how to pick the best funds, according to a new survey.
Nearly 9 in 10 workers view 401(k) plans as essential employee benefits, far outdistancing disability insurance, extra vacation days and the option to work from home, according to the poll by Charles Schwab Corp.
But the typical employee spends only about two hours analyzing 401(k) choices, roughly half the time spent researching car purchases or vacations.
Half of poll respondents said their 401(k)s are more confusing than the medical plans.
Only about one-quarter of survey participants have sought professional advice with their 401(k)s, according to the survey. That’s far less than the 87 percent who pay a professional to change the oil in their car.
“With so much at stake, the industry needs to take a more active role in delivering personalized investment advice to help individuals’ 401(k)s work harder for them,” said Steve Anderson, head of Schwab Retirement Plan Services.
“One-for-all default investments, such as target date funds or balanced funds, can’t be expected to meet the individual needs of workers,” he said. “The industry can do better.”
However, earlier research has shown that employees must be extremely careful about 401(k) advice.
A study by the U.S. General Accountability Office in 2011 found that what passed as education offered by firms running 401(k) plans often was little more than a sales pitch designed to push high-cost investments on unsuspecting employees.

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