Allstate pulls Sandy ads showing home at center of dispute

CHICAGO — Allstate Corp. said it will remove from its advertising an image of a Sandy-ravaged home whose Staten Island, N.Y., owners have expressed unhappiness over their claims payment from the Northbrook, Ill.-based insurer.

The Traina family was offered $10,000 for damages to the place they’ve called home for 43 years, the couple told the New York Post last week. Then the home was used in an Allstate advertisement about how it takes care of its policyholders.

“We have continued to reach out to the Trainas to discuss their concerns and are committed to resolving the matter in accordance with the policy they purchased from our company,” Allstate spokeswoman Laura Strykowski told the Chicago Tribune on Monday.

Much will hinge on whether the damage was caused by wind or water.

Traditional homeowners’ policies, such as those written by Allstate, don’t cover losses from flooding. For that, homeowners may buy coverage from the U.S. government’s National Flood Insurance Program.

“It is our understanding that the Trainas chose to drop their flood insurance policy before Sandy struck,” Strykowski said. “We encourage our customers to consider flood insurance to protect themselves in ways that would not be covered under a homeowner’s policy.”

The Trainas, who heeded evacuation warnings, told the Post that neighbors who stayed behind told them that wind gusts tore off their roof and toppled walls before the area was flooded.

Allstate’s Strykowski said that the TV ad in question showed general images of Sandy’s destruction, including a “partial image” of the Trainas’ home.

“It does not reference them as customers or in any way imply they are satisfied with the status of their claim,” she said. “We regret any concern this advertisement may have caused the Trainas and images of their home will not be included in Allstate’s advertising.”

Allstate has paid out almost $1.1 billion in Sandy-related claims payments.

More in Herald Business Journal

Glitches slow Boeing, SpaceX plans for human spaceflight

Boeing has an issue with its abort system that may cause the spacecraft to “tumble.”

Best foot forward: Ferndale company to make custom shoes easy

Long specializing in insoles, Superfeet is putting 3-D machines in stores to make customized shoes.

Planemaker joins forces with auto-industry supplier Adient

The new venture poses a threat to Zodiac Aerospace and Rockwell Collins

Alaska Airlines has selected destinations for new service from Paine Field. (Alaska Airlines)
Alaska Airlines will fly from Everett to 8 West Coast cities

Two destinations that didn’t make the list were Spokane and Hawaii.

Port of Everett CEO Les Reardanz has been called up and will be spending much of the year away from his office. He is going to Afghanistan. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Port of Everett CEO reporting for duty — in Afghanistan

Les Reardanz has been called to active duty with the Navy for an eight-month deployment.

Boeing opens new $17 million training center in Auburn

Workers and dignitaries marked the grand opening of the facility Monday.

Trump’s company fights efforts to shed the president’s name

“Our homes are worth more without the Trump name.”

Airbus floats shutdown of A380 superjumbo

The aircraft is so big that some airports had to expand runways to accommodate the 550-seat plane.

Does a hypersonic US reconnaissance plane already exist?

A Skunk Works executive speaks of the top secret aircraft as if it is already in operation.

Most Read