Back-to-school shoppers expected to spend less

Shopping for a K-12 student is still an expensive proposition, but parents this year are planning to trim their spending and focus on necessities, according to a survey from the National Retail Federation.

The average expenditure for apparel, shoes, electronics and supplies will fall to $634.78 from last year’s record $688.62, which was partly driven up by pent-up post-recession demand, according to the trade group.

In all, parents will shell out $26.7 billion nationwide throughout the season. Separately, preparations for college will cost Americans $45.8 billion, or $836.83 on average.

The per-student college figure is down from $907.22 last year and includes spending on clothing, technology, dorm furnishings and more.

Roughly 8 in 10 shoppers – whether buying for primary, secondary or higher levels of education – say they’ll adjust their spending plans to deal with the economy.

“As they continue to grapple with the impact of increased payroll taxes, Americans will look to cut corners where they can, but will buy what their kids need,” said Matthew Shay, the retail group’s chief executive, in a statement.

Parents shopping for school-age children are getting an early start, with 23.9 percent of families saying they are already scouring the racks and nosing through shelves. That’s the highest percentage ever of consumers launching their back-to-school preparations two months before classes begin.

The ratio of early birds on the college shopping circuit also hit a record, with 29.8 percent looking for deals now, according to the report.

More than a third of parents say they plan to do more comparative shopping online. Nearly 4 in 10 college shoppers say they’ll hit the Internet for their retail needs.

More in Herald Business Journal

Happy accident leads Edmonds couple to make Hunniwater drink

The latest line of energy drinks by Karin and Eric… Continue reading

Single payer is no panacea for our costly health care system

We must address the cost of health care before designing an insurance system.

Voters are on the sidelines as the port fills a vacant seat

Troy McClelland resigned from the Port of Everett commission too late for an election before 2019.

Career Fair planned next week at Tulalip Resort Casino

The Snohomish County Career Fair is planned from 10 a.m. to 2… Continue reading

American Farmland Trust president to speak in Mount Vernon

American Farmland Trust President John Piotti plans to give a talk about… Continue reading

In new setback, Uber to lose license to work in London

The company, beset by litany of scandals, was told it was not “fit and proper” to keep operating there.

Not home? Walmart wants to walk in and stock your fridge

The retailer is trying out the service with tech-savvy shoppers who have internet-connected locks.

Trade panel: Cheap imports hurt US solar industry

The ruling raises the possibility of tariffs that could double the price of solar panels.

Agent joins Re/Max in Smokey Point

Dennis Roland joined the Re/Max Elite Smokey Point office. The Navy veteran… Continue reading

Most Read