Biz Bits: people and businesses in the news

People

Todd Zurik has joined Whidbey Island Bank as a real-estate loan officer at the bank’s Lynnwood Financial Center. With more than 30 years experience in real estate in the Northwest, Zurik will be responsible for origination of residential, custom construction and land and building site loans in Snohomish County.

The appointment of Ian Cotton to the Lynnwood Planning Commission has been unanimously approved by the Lynnwood City Council. Cotton, an electrical project manager for Sparling, will fill the unexpired term of Position 2, which previously was held by Van AuBuchon but vacated upon his appointment to the Lynnwood City Council. Cotton’s term runs through 2016.

Kudos

Local entrepreneur Paul Davenport, owner of Molly Maid of Mill Creek and Woodinville, was recently presented with Molly Maid’s 2012 Rookie of the Year award. Davenport had the highest average weekly sales of any new owner in 2012.

Good deeds

Lynnwood Fred Meyer employees presented a $5,000 check to Seattle Children’s Hospital last week. Employees won a company contest for having the highest percentage of employees donating to the company’s foundation, The Fred Meyer Fund. The store got to select a charity to receive the money.

Events

Beard Financial Group will present a free financial clinic from 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday at Firelight Bistro in Stanwood. The public can ask questions and discuss concerns with a professional financial planner, but this is not a sales event. For information, call 360-629-7575.

The Snohomish Center Vendor and Gift Show, a fundraiser for Snohomish Senior Center, runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. There will be more than 30 vendors, a plant sale and a bake sale, and the cafe will be open to serve lunch and snacks. For information, call the center at 360-568-0934.

The next Snohomish County Business Watch general meeting is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 16 at Mukilteo City Hall. The topic is how to plan for and survive an event involving a weapon. It is part of a series of training luncheons on preventing and responding to crime. This event’s speakers are officers Eddie Golden of the Everett Police Department and Matt Nelson of the Stillaguamish Tribal Police. Please RSVP to rsvp@thescbw.org.

HWA GeoSciences of Bothell has again teamed up with the Redmond Cycling Club to host the fifth annual Tour des Engineers bike ride around Whidbey Island. Registration is open for engineers, contractors or consultants who want to join the May 18 event. Register at www.hwageo.com.

Classes, workshops, webinars

HopeWorks Social Enterprises and Workforce Development Council Snohomish County are collaborating on a series of brown bag workshops to assist nonprofits. The next one is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday at Housing Hope’s Ken Schilaty Learning Center in Everett. For more information, contact maryjonasen@hopewrks.org or call 425-347-6556.

Learn the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs at the next meeting of Leadership Snohomish County. The workshop, presented by Ian Ayers, begins at 8 a.m. on Friday in the Jackson Center at 2000 Tower St. in Everett. Cost is $65 for the morning or $175 for the full day. Go to www.eventbrite.com/event/5378513278 to register.

Katheleen Steele will teach seniors and their adult children how to organize personal, financial and legal information into one document. This free public workshop is at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday at Harbour Pointe Residential Retirement and Assisted Living in Mukilteo. A complimentary workbook and boxed lunch will be provided. Call 425-493-8555 by Friday to register.

Washington State University’s Snohomish County Extension will sponsor workshops on low-volume drip irrigation systems at 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. on May 10, June 5 and July 11 at the Education Center in Everett’s McCollum Park. Cost is $20 per person or $25 for a couple. To register, call Karie Christensen at 425-357-6039 or download the brochure at snohomish.wsu.edu.

Announcements

A Sunday farmers market is coming to Snohomish. The new market is operated by Neil Landaas and Dorothea Eckert of Flying Tomato Farm. It will be open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays from June 2 through Sept 29. For information on how to participate, contact Landaas at 206-412-4630 or rockfish5@seanet.com.

Send your Biz Bits news and high-resolution color photos by email to businessnews@heraldnet.com.

More in Herald Business Journal

Teddy, an English bulldog, models Zentek Clothing’s heat regulating dog jacket. (Ian Terry / The Herald)
Everett clothing company keeps your dog cool and stylish

Zentek uses space-age fabrics to moderate the temperature of pets and now humans.

Everett engineers learn lessons from Mexico City catastrophe

Structural scientists went to help after the September earthquake there and studied the damage.

DaVita to sell off medical groups including The Everett Clinic

Another round of health care consolidation means The Everett Clinic could soon get new ownership.

Engine trouble hits Air New Zealand’s 787 Dreamliners

A Rolls-Royce engine was shut down and was afterward found to be seriously damaged.

Washington, Amazon sue company over seller training programs

Braintree is accused of using deceptive ads promising information on how to make money on Amazon.

The Marine Corps’ version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is designed to land vertically like a helicopter. (Lockheed Martin)
F-35 fighter costs, $1 trillion over 60 years, draw scrutiny

Pentagon’s ability to repair F-35 parts at military depots is six years behind schedule.

Incidents of severe disturbances on commercial flights climb

The number of cases in which the cabin crew had to restrain a passenger rose to 169 last year.

Funko mascots Freddy Funko roll past on a conveyor belt in the Pop! Factory of the company’s new flagship store on Aug. 18, 2017. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Funko starts to bounce back after disappointing stock debut

The Everett toys-and-collectibles maker also announced the acquisition of an animation studio.

Now hiring: Younger factory workers, at Boeing and elsewhere

The company and its training partners are fighting perceptions of a dying manufacturing industry.