Boeing adds new orders for 45 planes

CHICAGO — Boeing says it sold 45 planes to unidentified customers in the past week, pushing its total sales of commercial planes for the year to more than 1,100 with a few more days to go.

Boeing said the orders were for 15 of its workhorse 737s, built in Renton, and 30 of its big, long-haul 777s, built in Everett. The weekly order update also shows previously announced orders for five other planes.

Boeing also noted cancellations for one each of its 747, 777, and 737.

Boeing Co. says it will release its full-year order total early next month. It is on track to pass Airbus for the most commercial plane orders for the year. As of Tuesday, Boeing has booked 1,115 orders, including cancellations. Airbus booked orders for 585 commercial planes through the end of November.

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