Boeing begins 787 flight training in Miami, ups estimate for pilot demand

Boeing launched 787 flight training Thursday at its campus in Miami.

The company also increased its forecast for global demand for pilots and maintenance technicians. Boeing now says the world’s carriers will need more than one million new pilots and technicians by 2032.

“The urgent demand for competent aviation personnel is a global issue that is here now and is very real,” Sherry Carbary, vice president of Boeing Flight Services, said in a statement. “The key to closing the pilot and technician gap in our industry is enhancing our training with the latest, cutting-edge technologies to attract and retain young people interested in careers in aviation.”

Boeing is using some of that cutting-edge technology with the 787 flight training simulators.

In March, the jet maker announced it would move its flight training services to Miami from the Puget Sound region, beginning with the relocation of two 787 flight simulators. Boeing said then that about 100 employees in the area would be affected.

The company said Thursday the consolidation of flight services to Miami “is designed to bring training closer to where customers operate, reducing travel times for airline crews and the costs of sending students for training.”

Boeing said it’s adding $100 million in training assets to the Miami location.

“Miami’s location at the crossroads of the Americas offers tremendous advantages as a preferred location for airlines based in Latin America, Canada and the United States,” Carbary said. “Customers also travel from Europe, Africa, the Middle East and China to conduct training in Miami.”

Aeromexico and LAN Airlines are the first two airlines to use Boeing’s 787 flight services in Miami.

For more on Boeing’s forecast for pilot and maintenance technicians, read the company’s statement. For more on the Miami training center, see this Boeing video.

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