Boeing faces $2.7 million fine over 777 program

Federal aviation officials are seeking to fine the Boeing Co. $2.75 million for failing to fully correct quality problems in the company’s 777 program.

“Manufacturers must make it a priority to identify and correct quality problems in a timely manner,” Michael Huerta, Federal Aviation Administrator, said in a statement Friday.

The FAA said that Boeing discovered in September 2008 that it had been installing faulty fasteners on 777 aircraft. At the FAA’s request, Boeing submitted plans to correct the problem. The FAA alleges that Boeing did not implement those plans until two years later, in November 2010.

Boeing has stopped using the defective fasteners. But the FAA says the “underlying manufacturing issues continued to exist until after the corrective action plan was in place.”

Boeing has 30 days to respond to the penalty.

The company is working closely with the FAA to address remaining concerns, according to an emailed statement from Elizabeth Fischtziur, spokeswoman for the 777 program. Boeing said it takes the safety of its products very seriously.

To address the fastener problem, “we implemented an enhanced corrective action management system that includes a robust database for tracking issues, additional management oversight and a series of regular meetings with the FAA,” Boeing said in the statement.

More in Herald Business Journal

An Alaska Airlines Embraer 175. The carrier plans to use this model on routes to and from Paine Field in Everett. (Alaska Airlines)
Company VP: Alaska Airlines hopes to be a decent neighbor

Diana Birkett Rakow shared aspects of the company’s philosophy as keynote at an Economic Alliance event.

Safe saves Everett Office Furniture’s future after fire

The business was able to reopen because vital paperwork was preserved.

Get ready for the era of hypersonic flight — at Mach 5

The Pentagon sees hypersonic weaponry as a potential game changer.

Why real estate investors are watching self-driving cars closely

With decisions on real estate made years in advance, could self-driving cars change how we live?

More than 60 Boeing 737s per month: Can suppliers keep up?

There was lots of talk this week about the prudence and pressures of soaring production rates.

Developer proposes an 18-story building in Lynnwood

It would be the second-tallest in the county and include apartments with retail space.

Snohomish County business licenses

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary… Continue reading

New Everett mayor speaks out about business in city, region

Q&A: Cassie Franklin on what can be done to get Boeing to build the 797 here and attract new industries.

Aerospace analyst explains how he’ll help state’s Boeing bid

Richard Aboulafia will deliver a report on Washington’s strengths and weaknesses in landing the 797.

Most Read