Boeing gets boost as Qatar, Asian carriers defend 787

After a couple of rough days with its 787 jet, Boeing Co. shares rebounded early Wednesday.

Boeing shares were up more than 3 percent in early trading Wednesday.

The company’s stock took a beating Monday after one of its 787 jets operated by Japan Airlines caught fire while parked at Boston’s Logan International Airport. An initial inspection by Boeing and the National Transportation Safety Board traced the problem back to a battery in the auxiliary power unit.

Boeing’s Mike Sinnett explained why Monday’s incident isn’t the same as previous 787 electrical problems in this story in the Seattle Times.

On Tuesday, another Japan Airlines 787 leaked about 40 gallons of fuel, delaying the flight for several hours as maintenance crews inspected the plane.

A third 787 problem was reported Wednesday in Japan as All Nippon Airways scratched a 787 flight after a braking issue.

Boeing and its Dreamliner got support Wednesday from a seemingly unlikely source: Qatar Airways’ Akbar Al Baker, who previously had harsh words for Boeing over 787 glitches.

Al Baker described the 787’s woes as “teething problems” in an interview with Bloomberg News. Qatar has no plans to cancel its 787s on order.

Asian carriers also rallied around the 787 with representatives of both ANA and JAL telling Reuters they have no plans to cancel their 787 orders.

Also of note Wednesday, representatives for Boeing and the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace head back to negotiations in hopes of staving off a strike by Boeing’s 22,950 engineers and technical workers.

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