Boeing has ‘productive’ meeting with FAA on 787 battery fix

A meeting Friday between Boeing Co. and federal aviation officials on the company’s grounded 787 was a “productive” one.

It’s unclear, however, whether the Federal Aviation Administration will sign off on Boeing’s proposed fix to return the 787 to commercial flight.

“The safety of the flying public is our top priority and we won’t allow the 787 to return to commercial service until we’re confident that any proposed solution has addressed the battery failure risks,” the FAA said in a statement Friday.

Ray Conner, president of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, met with Michael Huerta, administrator of the FAA, in Washington, D.C.

Boeing called the meeting “productive” and was encouraged by progress made during the meeting, the company said in a statement.

“Boeing has drawn upon resources from across the company and externally, pulling together teams of hundreds of experts and working this issue around the clock for the past several weeks. The company has been working closely with the FAA and other authorities throughout,” the company said.

The FAA grounded Boeing’s 787 on Jan. 16 after the lithium-ion batteries failed on two Dreamliners in incidents less than two weeks apart. Fifty 787s had been delivered to airlines at that time.

Sources told the Associated Press that Boeing is suggesting a battery fix that would increase the space between cells in the lithium-ion batteries. That proposal would mean keeping the 787s grounded at least until April.

FAA said on Friday it is reviewing Boeing’s proposal and will “analyze it closely.”

The National Transportation Safety Board is still investigating a Jan. 7 battery fire on a Japan Airlines 787. The NTSB is expected to release a preliminary report on the incident next month.

More in Herald Business Journal

Snohomish County’s campaign to land the 797 takes off

Executive Dave Somers announced the formation of a task force to urge Boeing to build the plane here.

A decade after the recession, pain and fear linger

No matter how good things are now, it’s impossible to forget how the collapse affected people.

Panel: Motorcycle industry in deep trouble and needs help

They have failed to increase sales by making new riders out of women, minorities and millennials.

Costco rises as results display big-box retailer’s resiliency

Their model has worked in the face of heightened competition from online, brick-and-mortar peers.

For modern women, 98-year-old rejection letters still sting

In a stark new video, female Boeing engineers break the silence about past inopportunity.

Tax reform needs the public’s input on spending priorities

The GOP tax plan is a good idea, but the next step should give us a voice on how taxes are spent.

Commentary: GM, Boeing fight a war of words over Mars

Boeing is strongly signaling how crucial deep-space exploration is to its future.

Under cloud of ethics probes, Airbus CEO Enders to step down

He leaves in 2019 after 14 years. Meanwhile, aircraft division CEO Fabrice Bregier leaves in February.

$4.99 sandwich promotion irks some Subway business owners

Management insists that “most franchisees support the promotion.”

Most Read