Boeing makes new offer to SPEEA

On Tuesday, the Boeing Co. presented its latest contract offer to union representing 22,765 engineers and technical workers in the Puget Sound region.

But initial reaction from leaders of the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace wasn’t positive.

The new offer leaves “no doubt that Boeing corporate believes engineers and technical workers played only a minor part in turning the company around after executives took us to the brink of disaster with 787 outsourcing and a litany of bad decisions,” union negotiators wrote in a message to members.

Boeing leaders said their new proposal rewarded SPEEA members for their contributions while allowing the area workforce to “remain competitive for future work.”

The company said it hopes to continue negotiating with the union. SPEEA’s message to members was unclear about future negotiations with the company. Instead, SPEEA said it had filed an unfair labor practice complaint against Boeing with the National Labor Relations Board.

It’s not the first complaint filed by SPEEA during these negotiations. In this latest complaint, SPEEA accused Boeing of threatening discipline for workers engaging in union activities.

Boeing’s new contract proposal includes increases in pay and improvements to health care costs as compared to the offer members voted down Oct. 1, company negotiators wrote in a message to SPEEA members Tuesday.

The company’s offer includes raises of between 3 percent and 4.5 percent annually over the four year contract. The first contract offer included annual increases of 2 percent to 3.5 percent. The existing contract included raises of 5 percent. SPEEA had asked for 7.5 percent.

Boeing posted specifics of the offer for engineers and for technical workers on its negotiations website.

SPEEA posted an analysis of Boeing’s offer on its negotiations website.

SPEEA leaders hinted on Monday that a strike authority vote could be in order, noting “it is becoming clear Boeing corporate may need additional persuasion.” The union already is encouraging members to boycott voluntary overtime and “work to rule,” which means employees follow procedures to the letter, effectively slowing down work.

SPEEA could not strike until Nov. 26, but union leaders said last week that a strike would not be likely until after Jan. 1. The union has only staged one significant strike of 40 days in 2000.

In Boeing’s update Tuesday, the company noted that the terms of the union’s contract, which expired Oct. 6, remain in place as the two sides continue to negotiate.

“Employees should continue to report for work as normal,” Boeing negotiators wrote.

Check Heraldnet.com for updates on this story.

More in Herald Business Journal

County planners seek denial of Woodway-area luxury condos

Concerns remain over design and traffic plans for the 3,081-unit development at Point Wells.

New Everett hotel will double waterfront rooms in the county

Construction on Hotel Indigo at the Port of Everett’s new live-work-play development begins Thursday.

Audit clears Facebook despite Cambridge Analytica leaks

The heavily redacted audit by PricewaterhouseCoopers is available on the FTC’s website.

Wells Fargo to pay $1B for mortgage, auto lending abuses

It appears that none of the $1 billion will go directly the victims of Wells Fargo’s abuses.

Washington unemployment rate at 4.8 percent

The largest job gains last month were in manufacturing retail trade and leisure and hospitality.

‘Fearless Girl’ to leave Wall Street’s ‘Charging Bull’

But she may be reunited with the ‘Charging Bull’ sculpture in a new location.

US on track for the longest expansion ever, but at a cost

Goldman Sachs: There’s 90% chance expansion will break the record set during the 1990s tech boom.

Road to homeownership gets rockier this spring as rates rise

First-time buyers face significant hurdles; starter homes have seen the steepest price increases.

Fly with dog or potbelly pig? Alaska wants more paperwork

It says about 150 emotional support and psychiatric service animals travel on its planes each day.

Most Read