Boeing, SPEEA talks postponed until January

The Boeing Co. and the union representing its engineers and technical workers agreed Wednesday to a federal mediator’s request to postpone negotiations until after the new year.

The decision to halt negotiations comes as talks between Boeing and the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace have reached a standstill.

In the interim, mediators will be in contact with Boeing and the union “to schedule resumption of negotiations,” George H. Cohen, director for the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, said in a statement released Wednesday evening.

Federal mediators attended negotiating sessions between Boeing and SPEEA in Seattle on Tuesday and Wednesday. However, they were asked to serve only in a limited role and not lead the discussions.

Boeing requested the mediation service’s help last Thursday after another frustrating session for both parties. On Friday, the two couldn’t even agree where the talks with mediators should take place.

SPEEA represents 22,765 Boeing engineers and technical workers in the Puget Sound region. Its members play a role in Boeing aircraft from concept to delivery, designing and testing jets.

The talks coincide with a production ramp up across Boeing’s jet programs. The company also has significant design projects in the works including the 787-9, the 737 MAX and the 767-based Air Force tanker.

Although Boeing and SPEEA began formal negotiations in April, the two remain at odds on major elements like wages, pension and medical benefits. In October, 15,097 SPEEA members voted to reject Boeing’s first offer, while only 608 members voted to accept it. Since then, the two sides on the key issues.

SPEEA leaders previously suggested that they soon could ask members to give them the OK to call a strike after the first of the year if talks didn’t improve.

The union’s only major strike of 40 days occurred in 2000.

More in Herald Business Journal

Stan Jones (left) father of Vice Chairwoman Teri Gobin, gets a handshake from Jared Parks while Herman Williams Sr. hugs Bonnie Juneau (right) after the Tulalip Tribes and Quil Ceda Creek Casino held a groundbreaking ceremony for the new Quil Ceda Creek Casino Hotel on Tuesday at the Tulalip Reservation. The casino hotel will be built on 16 acres of ancestral tribal land and will feature a main casino that will showcase as many as 1,500 slot machines. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Tulalips break ground on new Quil Ceda Creek Casino Hotel

A 150-room hotel was added to what is now a $140 million project in Tulalip.

Teddy, an English bulldog, models Zentek Clothing’s heat regulating dog jacket. (Ian Terry / The Herald)
Everett clothing company keeps your dog cool and stylish

Zentek uses space-age fabrics to moderate the temperature of pets and now humans.

Trudeau snubs Boeing, unveils plan to buy used Aussie jets

Trudeau will be assessing the impact fighter jet contracts have on his country’s economy.

Boeing raises dividend 20%, continues stock buyback program

The manufacturer said it has repurchased $9.2 billion worth of its shares this year.

Everett engineers learn lessons from Mexico City catastrophe

Structural scientists went to help after the September earthquake there and studied the damage.

Providence Hospital in Everett at sunset Monday night. Officials Providence St. Joseph Health Ascension Health reportedly are discussing a merger that would create a chain of hospitals, including Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, plus clinics and medical care centers in 26 states spanning both coasts. (Kevin Clark / The Daily Herald)
Merger would make Providence part of health care behemoth

Providence St. Joseph Health and Ascension Health are said to be talking. Swedish would also be affected.

Hospital companies merge as insurers encroach on their turf

An anticipated deal between Providence St. Joseph Health and Ascension is only the latest.

DaVita to sell off medical groups including The Everett Clinic

Another round of health care consolidation means The Everett Clinic could soon get new ownership.

Engine trouble hits Air New Zealand’s 787 Dreamliners

A Rolls-Royce engine was shut down and was afterward found to be seriously damaged.

Most Read