British Airways’ owner orders Airbus A350-1000s

The owner of British Airways signed a tentative deal Monday to buy up to 36 Airbus A350-1000 aircraft.

International Airline Group, the owner of British Airways and Iberia, pledged to buy 18 A350s and secured options for 18 more, Airbus said Monday. The order is valued at $12 billion at list prices.

“This is an important announcement from one of the world’s most respected and influential airline brands,” John Leahy, Airbus chief operating officer for customers, said in a statement.

British Airways also has expressed interest in buying an updated version of Boeing’s 777, dubbed the 777X, when the Chicago-based company gets the OK to offer that jet to customers.

Earlier this month, IAG agreed to buy 18 Boeing 787s for British Airways. Both British Airways and Iberia are planning to retire older jets, including Boeing 747-400s, 777-200s and Airbus A330s and A340s.

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