Congress, AF hope to preserve Boeing KC-46 budget

Both Congress and the Pentagon seem to agree that now is not the time to cut funding for the Air Force’s KC-46 tanker program.

It took the Air Force a decade to award a contract to the Boeing Co. for the aerial refueling tanker, which is based on Boeing’s Everett-built 767 commercial aircraft. The new KC-46A will replace Eisenhower-era KC-135 tankers, also built by Boeing.

Air Force wants to “protect the tanker no matter what,” Lt. Gen. Charles Davis, who leads Air Force acquisition, said on Tuesday.

The ‘no matter what’ refers to the across-the-board budget cuts, known as sequestration, the federal government is facing.

The Air Force had $870 million allotted for the tanker program in 2012 with a plan of increasing tanker funding to $1.8 billion this year. Since Congress couldn’t reach an agreement on the 2013 budget, the government is operating under a continuing resolution that frozen spending at 2012 levels. For the tanker program, a freeze means less money is going to the tanker program than planned.

The good news for Boeing’s KC-46 tanker is that both sides of Congress want to fund the tanker at the $1.8 billion level.

The House preserved that level of tanker spending in its 2013 budget proposal, which has been sent to the Senate, said a spokesman for Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash. Although the Senate’s proposed budget isn’t the same as the House’s, so far the $1.8 billion tanker portion of it remains the same.

For more on tanker funding, read this Air Force Times story.

More in Herald Business Journal

Will thousands of new apartments in Snohomish County mean lower rents?

Experts debate the meaning of a recent price drop, one of the biggest decreases in more than a decade.

Facebook CEO: Mistakes were made, remedies are planned

Mark Zuckerberg says Facebook has a “responsibility” to protect user data.

As expected, 92 to be laid off by Stanwood’s Twin City Foods

The frozen-vegetables processor announced last year it was moving all operations to Pasco.

Mother-in-law homes popular after cities ease restrictions

Lynnwood and Everett are seeing a spurt of growth after changing city codes to allow for this development.

Albertsons to close one of its two Everett stores

The grocery chain says it continuously evaluates performance of stores, which means closing this one.

Boeing CEO Muilenburg’s total compensation rose to $18.5M

That’s up from just over $15 million a year earlier. It includes the value of stock awards in 2017.

The British soda tax might work better than other soda taxes

By Caitlin Dewey / The Washington Post The great British soda tax… Continue reading

Most Read