Demand drives growth at Mukilteo’s Electroimpact

MUKILTEO — Electroimpact is growing.

The Mukilteo-based company is adding a new production building and hiring more workers.

Founded in 1986, the company has developed a worldwide reputation for making highly-specialized machines for aerospace manufacturing and assembly.

Electroimpact is adding a 29,700-square-foot building to its campus near Paine Field. The foundation is laid, and the pre-fabricated building should be ready in a few months, said Peter Zieve, the company’s CEO and founder.

The building will be used to make giant machines used for making even bigger machines — often airplanes.

Electroimpact’s customers include the world’s major commercial jet makers: Airbus, Boeing, Bombardier and Embraer. It has gotten into the Chinese market with Comac, which is trying to break into the narrow-body jetliner market.

For Boeing’s 787, Electroimpact designed a machine to lay carbon-fiber-composite material tape much faster than what was available at the time.

The company hopes to make machines for producing the composite material wings on Boeing’s 777X, which will be assembled at the airplane-maker’s nearby Everett plant.

In February, the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance tapped Electroimpact as its aerospace company of the year.

Electroimpact’s growth is in response to “overall demand,” rather than due to a specific project, Zieve said.

“The workforce keeps expanding,” he said.

Earlier this year, the company had about 600 employees, and it should be at roughly 700 by the end of the year, he said.

Most are in Mukilteo. The company also has about 120 workers in the United Kingdom and a handful of employees scattered across the globe.

Dan Catchpole: 425-339-3454; dcatchpole@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @dcatchpole.

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