Dreamliner scare draws mixed reactions

The latest Dreamliner glitch, the emergency landing of an All Nippon Airways’ 787, has received varied reactions from airlines, analysts and observers.

Boeing’s shares are down roughly 3.3 percent in early trading Wednesday.

ANA has determined the main battery in the 787’s forward electronics section “was discolored and the electrolysis solution had leaked.” Previous problems on 787s involved the electronics bay in the back, not front, of airplane. ANA said the same 787 had experienced battery problems before, according to this Wall Street Journal report.

Both ANA and Japan Airlines have grounded their 787s for inspections. ANA canceled 35 flights and swapped 787s out for other aircraft on 31 other flights. The carrier also issued this apology to customers.

Air India said it’s waiting for instruction from Boeing or aviation authorities on what to do with its 787s.

LOT Polish Airlines is going ahead with its first trans-Atlantic flight using a 787 today.

United Airlines, Qatar Airways and Ethiopian Airlines all have 787s in the air this morning, according to FlightAware.

Analyst Scott Hamilton, with Leeham Co., urged caution in drawing conclusions before ANA and Boeing can look into the latest incident.

Jefferies International analyst Sandy Morris wrote this in a note published by Bloomberg: “After thousands of hours of testing, the ANA and JAL incidents are perplexing.”

Finally, this Wall Street Journal report out of Japan has passengers, pilots and ANA spokespeople giving varying accounts about the presence of smoke on the aircraft.

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