Everett distiller releases organic gin

EVERETT — John Lundin speaks fondly of the device he uses to distill spirits at Bluewater Distilling. He refers to the still as “her” and affectionately pats the hand-hammered copper kettle as he explains its history and how it works.

The newest creation from Bluewater Distilling, Halcyon organic gin, was recently released. The gin joins the distillery’s other spirit, organic vodka.

“We want to create responsibly crafted artisan spirits,” Lundin said.

Part of that is organic certification. The glass bottles are another part. All of the glass is of domestic origin — from Missouri. Lundin said that he could find cheaper glass but likes to support domestic businesses and reduce the impact of transporting bottles. Halcyon gin labels feature an American glass icon, which was created specifically for Bluewater.

Bluewater Distilling also participates in One Percent for the Planet, an organization of businesses worldwide which have pledged one percent of sales to help environmental organizations.

Lundin creates the gin by seeping organic botanicals in the still with alcohol and water. The process is very hands-on, he said. As the heat increases, each botanical flavor comes off at different time. Throughout the process, he monitors the flavor to make sure he’s getting just what he wants. The gin is made in the London dry style, which, Lundin said, probably has 400 years of evolution and perfection. As with all gins, the primary flavor is juniper. But it also includes coriander, lemon, orange, licorice, angelica root, orris root and cassia bark.

The distillery operates out of space on the Everett waterfront, in the same building as Scuttlebutt Brewery. The gin is 92 proof and sells for $34.50, including tax, for a 750-milliliter bottle. The brewery is open Tuesday to Sunday from noon to 7 p.m.

More in Herald Business Journal

Nordstrom suspends buyout after struggling to get financing

A buyout was meant to help the company continue turnaround efforts outside the glare of market scrutiny.

More self-awareness could help build a better medical system

Marcy Shimada of Edmonds Family Medicine writes the second in a series about fixing our health care system.

Justices to hear government’s email dispute with Microsoft

A lower court ruled emails in a drug case couldn’t be searched because they were in Ireland.

Bombardier said to explore options for aerospace assets

The Canadian planemaker is contending with newly imposed U.S. import duties of 300 percent.

Everett’s Access Laser sells majority stake to German company

Everett firm with 50 employees makes lasers for scientific, medical fields and self-driving vehicles

Innovation Resource Center’s advice for budding inventors

Got the next great idea? The Buildit NOW program stands ready to help you.

Mountain Pacific Bank to host Economic Forum in Everett

Mountain Pacific Bank’s Economic Forum is from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday… Continue reading

Career-community resources fair planned this week at EdCC

Edmonds Community College will host a free fall quarter career fair featuring… Continue reading

Most Read