Everett warehouse a good fit for Majestic Glove

EVERETT — In between Majestic Glove’s extra-tall warehouse shelves, which are stacked with boxes of safety gloves, safety vests and related gear, a computer-guided forklift takes its operator to where an ordered item is stored.

Wires in the floor help the forklift navigate around the distribution center. When it reaches its destination, the forklift lifts up its safety-harnessed operator, who can grab what’s needed. Warehouse lights attached to motion sensors turn off when not needed.

It’s efficient, which is what Majestic Glove’s managers wanted when they decided to build a new headquarters along West Casino Road, within sight of Boeing’s Everett assembly complex.

The overall space is about 40 percent larger than the company’s previous building, but that doesn’t tell the whole story, said John Damon, vice president of Majestic Glove.

The ceilings in the new warehouse extend 36 feet up instead of the usual 24, allowing for the storage of 70 percent more product in the same square footage. That reduced the amount of property needed for the building.

Designed by Seattle architect Lance Mueller and developed by Panattoni Development, the building has big windows and an exterior that mirrors the company colors.

Originally founded in the Netherlands, where it still has a sister company, Majestic Glove came to the Puget Sound area more than 30 years ago. Since 2000, it has been based in the industrial corridor of south Everett.

“It’s very central for us, and it’s a business-friendly environment here,” Damon said of Everett.

Customers include construction firms, the petroleum and chemical industries, laboratories, metal and shipbuilding companies — any industry that requires safety gear or protective clothing that can withstand chemicals, hazardous materials or fire.

The move from an office and warehouse building on Hardeson Road to the new 112,000-square-foot building was compelled by growth, Damon said. In the past eight years, business has tripled.

Employing about 45 people, Majestic Glove designs and tests its products at the headquarters while manufacturing takes place overseas. A small production area in the new building can customize products.

Damon credited the long period of growth to employees who provide good customer service and Majestic’s reputation for quality.

“It’s all about fit, form and function,” Damon said, noting that company President Hugo Kruiniger is a stickler for details. “For example, the sewing on our products is more precise, so it lasts longer. That helps to separate us from our competition.”

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