FAA looking into Boeing land purchase in Charleston

CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Federal Aviation Administration is concerned about the sale of airport property near Charleston International Airport to Boeing, the local aviation authority has been warned. The land is near where the aerospace giant has its 787 aircraft assembly plant.

The Post and Courier of Charleston reported that authority attorney Arnold Goodstein told the authority board on Tuesday that the FAA is “asking a lot of questions” about the sale of the 320 acres of land.

Authority Chairman Andy Savage said the federal agency has concerns about the $12.5 million price for the land and is concerned the deal could affect the airport’s overall operations.

The FAA must approve the sale. Boeing South Carolina spokeswoman Candy Eslinger would not talk about the case.

Goodstein, airport officials and Boeing representatives met with FAA representatives in Washington this week to move the deal along. Savage said aviation authority officials made it clear that while it didn’t get the deal it wanted on the land purchase, the authority stands behind Boeing.

The aviation authority voted in March to sell the land, splitting the difference between a set of appraisals conducted by both parties.

The FAA is looking at the authority’s initial appraisal of $27.6 million, Savage said. But that figure appraised the land as if it were ready for development and didn’t include the costs of filling numerous wetlands and removing a radar site.

Boeing has not said specifically what it plans for the site.

The company announced in April that it will add at least 2,000 jobs during the next seven years. It already employs 6,000 workers who assemble the 787 Dreamliner jet.

More in Herald Business Journal

3 must-try doughnuts when Top Pot opens in Edmonds

After two years of work, the popular Seattle chain is opening its second Snohomish County location.

Mother-in-law homes popular after cities ease restrictions

Lynnwood and Everett are seeing a spurt of growth after changing city codes to allow for this development.

Facebook bans Trump-affiliated data firm Cambridge Analytica

The company allegedly held onto improperly obtained user data after claiming to have deleted it.

Boeing’s newest 737 Max makes first flight over Seattle

Prospects for the new aircraft — the Max 7 — are hazy, as low-cost carriers migrated to larger models.

Boeing’s an early casualty as investors dig in for trade war

The company’s share price is headed toward its biggest weekly slump in more than two years.

A niche Bothell publisher is becoming a mortgage matchmaker

Scotsman Guide has long served lending professionals. Now it’s offering information to borrowers.

Premera pledges $250M of tax cut to health coverage, charity

Cocoon House is among the beneficiaries, receiving $1.6 million from the non-profit health insurer.

Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots

Boeing predicts that the U.S. will need 117,000 new pilots by 2036.

Superstore chain Fred Meyer to stop selling guns, ammunition

Guns have been sold at nearly 45 of more than 130 stores in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska.

Trump’s possible China tariffs bring loud protests — in US

A potential trade war could reverberate across the U.S. economy.

Nike president to leave as company reviews improper conduct

By Matt Townsend / Bloomberg Nike is reviewing improper conduct at the… Continue reading

Does the IRS have your money?

The agency says it has refunds worth $1.1 billion just waiting to be claimed.