FAA: Low oil indicator diverts 787 flight

NEWARK, N.J. — A United Airlines Boeing 787 flying from London to Houston was diverted to Newark, N.J., on Thursday because of a low engine oil indicator.

The Federal Aviation Administration said that United Flight 125 landed safely at 2:10 p.m. at Newark Liberty International Airport outside New York City. The agency said it would look into the incident.

United said there were 218 passengers, four pilots and 11 flight attendants on board.

Airline spokeswoman Christen David said the plane would undergo maintenance inspection. She said United was working on getting the passengers to Houston.

It was the second such incident involving a United Boeing 787 this week.

On Tuesday a United flight heading to Tokyo from Denver was diverted to Seattle because of what the airline described as an oil filter issue. The airline put up about 200 passengers overnight in a hotel, then flew them to Tokyo on Wednesday on another 787.

The 787 is under unusual scrutiny because it was grounded worldwide for three months after lithium-ion batteries overheated on two of the jets.

Boeing redesigned the battery system to the FAA’s satisfaction, and the planes resumed flying last month. United is the only U.S. airline that operates the 787.

The Dreamliner is Boeing’s most technologically advanced airliner, with lightweight materials and other innovations designed to boost fuel efficiency. The fuel efficiency makes it suited for long flights including international routes.

At this week’s Paris Air Show, Boeing has been taking more orders for the original model and a planned larger version called the 787-10.

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