FAA official gives no date for 787 battery approval

The Federal Aviation Administration’s top official gave no indication Tuesday whether the agency will sign off on Boeing Co.’s redesigned 787 battery system.

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said that Boeing has completed all the testing and analysis on the new battery.

The FAA is reviewing the company’s reports, Huerta told the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee. However, Huerta did not say how quickly the FAA will decide whether to return the 787 to commercial flight.

The agency grounded Boeing’s 787 on Jan. 16 after two Dreamliner jets experienced battery failures. Boeing had delivered 49 of its new fuel-efficient 787 at the time of the grounding.

Huerta, along with Deborah Hersman, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, were among witnesses called to testify at a hearing about aviation safety.

The NTSB continues to investigate the Jan. 7 fire and smoke incident involving a 787 in Boston, Hersman said. The safety board last week held a forum on the use of lithium-ion batteries in transportation. The NTSB also plans to hold a hearing next week on the 787 battery problems. Hersman’s submitted this testimony to the committee.

Senators questioned Huerta about the affects of budget cuts on the FAA, which has announced a plan to close control towers at 149 small airports.

More in Herald Business Journal

Somers sees Paine Field as focal point of a thriving county

In an annual speech, he also acknowledged challenges such as opioid addiction, crime and homelessness.

Starbucks commits $10M for greener coffee cup

The company is testing a new bio-liner, made partially from plant-based material.

Can Zuckerberg’s media blitz take the pressure off Facebook?

The generally reclusive CEO sat for an interview on CNN and gave another to the publication Wired.

Facebook mishandles election data flap, crisis experts say

“Facebook has been too late. Facebook has done too little and has been too legalistic”

Will thousands of new apartments in Snohomish County mean lower rents?

Experts debate the meaning of a recent price drop, one of the biggest decreases in more than a decade.

As expected, 92 to be laid off by Stanwood’s Twin City Foods

The frozen-vegetables processor announced last year it was moving all operations to Pasco.

Mother-in-law homes popular after cities ease restrictions

Lynnwood and Everett are seeing a spurt of growth after changing city codes to allow for this development.

Albertsons to close one of its two Everett stores

The grocery chain says it continuously evaluates performance of stores, which means closing this one.

The British soda tax might work better than other soda taxes

By Caitlin Dewey / The Washington Post The great British soda tax… Continue reading

Most Read