FedEx to donate Boeing 727 to EvCC

EVERETT — Airplane mechanics in training at Everett Community College soon will be able to practice on a Boeing 727, thanks to a donation by FedEx.

A FedEx Express 727 freighter will arrive on Thursday at EvCC’s Aviation Maintenance Technician School at Paine Field.

“We’re so proud to be able to provide these aircraft to school aviation programs that are helping train our next generation of aviation professionals,” David Sutton, FedEx Express managing director of aircraft acquisition and sales, said in a statement Friday.

Sutton will hand over the aircraft at ceremony Thursday afternoon. Gov. Jay Inslee and EvCC President David Beyer will be there to receive FedEx’s gift.

The donated 727 freighter, built by the Boeing Co., will be the largest plane in the EvCC aviation maintenance program. Until now, curriculum about larger airplanes was presented in the classroom, with textbooks and on computers, Dave Bowen, director of EvCC’s aviation school, said in a statement.

“This donation gives our students a head start by better preparing them to enter the aerospace industry,” Bowen said.

This is the 76th 727 FedEx has donated over the past few years to aviation schools, community airports and fire departments for training purposes. The cargo company retired its last 727 from the fleet earlier this summer. It’s replacing the 727s with Boeing 757 freighters. FedEx also expects to receive the first of 50 767 freighters from Boeing this fall.

“Not only are the retired 727s providing essential training opportunities, but their retirement is also allowing FedEx to introduce more modern, fuel-efficient, lower-emission aircraft into our extensive fleet,” Sutton said.

EvCC’s Aviation Maintenance Technician School helps students prepare for a Federal Aviation Administration Airframe and Powerplant license, get a certificate in aviation technology or earn an associate of technical arts degree in aviation maintenance technology. EvCC’s program is one of 150 schools nationwide to train airframe and powerplant mechanics. Seventy-one students are enrolled during the summer quarter.

“Thanks to FedEx Express, EvCC students will be able to do hands-on training with a large aircraft, enhancing their skills and helping Washington lead the way as the world’s aerospace training center,” EvCC’s Beyer said.

The ceremony begins at 1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Paine Field administrative office, 3220 100th St. SW in Everett.

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