Former Intermec chief executive to lead Tektronix

The former chief executive of Intermec Technologies has been named president of Beaverton, Oregon,-based Tektronix.

Patrick Byrne had been serving as a vice president with Tek’s parent company, Danaher Corp.

Outgoing President Amir Aghdaei, who has run Tektronix since 2009, is now “group executive” of Danaher’s communications organization. Within Danaher’s corporate structure, communications is a subgroup of its broader test-and-measurement organization.

Prior to joining Danaher in 2012, Byrne had been chief executive of Intermec, a publicly traded, radio frequency identification specialist based in Everett.

Byrne left in 2012, a year after successful heart surgery, as Intermec was preparing to restructure following three years of losses. Intermec was sold several months later to Honeywell International for $600 million.

Before running Intermec, Byrne had spent eight years in executive roles at Tek’s chief rival, Agilent Technologies, and two years at Hewlett-Packard Co. before HP spun out Agilent. He holds engineering degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and from Stanford.

Tektronix makes oscilloscopes and other instruments that engineers use to develop and test electronics.

It’s the godfather to Oregon’s technology industry, spinning out dozens of smaller companies and establishing the state as a destination for electronics manufacturing and design.

Intermec had $677 million in revenue in Byrne’s last full year running that company. Sales in Tek’s instruments business totaled $843.7 million in 2007, its last full year before the company’s sale. (Danaher also acquired Tek’s communications business but operates that separately.)

Danaher does not disclose current financial results for Tektronix, but reported Thursday that Tek had its 11th consecutive quarterly decline in core revenues. However, Tek also posted its first increase in orders since 2011.

More in Herald Business Journal

Teddy, an English bulldog, models Zentek Clothing’s heat regulating dog jacket. (Ian Terry / The Herald)
Everett clothing company keeps your dog cool and stylish

Zentek uses space-age fabrics to moderate the temperature of pets and now humans.

Everett engineers learn lessons from Mexico City catastrophe

Structural scientists went to help after the September earthquake there and studied the damage.

Providence said to be in talks for merger with Ascension

The two Catholic health organizations have been exploring joining forces, sources say.

DaVita to sell off medical groups including The Everett Clinic

Another round of health care consolidation means The Everett Clinic could soon get new ownership.

Engine trouble hits Air New Zealand’s 787 Dreamliners

A Rolls-Royce engine was shut down and was afterward found to be seriously damaged.

Washington, Amazon sue company over seller training programs

Braintree is accused of using deceptive ads promising information on how to make money on Amazon.

Bitcoin futures soar amid frenzy over virtual currency

Trading began Sunday, and theprice rose as high as $18,850.

Lockheed-Martin dominates global arms sales, Boeing is 2nd

The combined sales of U.S.-based companies totaled $217 billion.

The Marine Corps’ version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is designed to land vertically like a helicopter. (Lockheed Martin)
F-35 fighter costs, $1 trillion over 60 years, draw scrutiny

Pentagon’s ability to repair F-35 parts at military depots is six years behind schedule.

Most Read