Foss Maritime’s parent company hires former city aide

EVERETT — The maritime firm planning to relocate to the waterfront here has named a former Everett city executive to lead its due diligence for buying the Kimberly-Clark mill site.

Seattle-based Saltchuk Resources announced Friday that Jim Langus will help the company finalize a deal to buy 66 acres of industrial waterfront from Kimberly-Clark Corp. of Dallas. Saltchuk is the parent company of Foss Maritime Co., which hopes to use the Everett property as a shipyard and as a home port for tugs and barges.

The companies announced the deal earlier this month. The sale is expected to close next year, following a four-month due diligence period.

Langus was a top Everett city administrator under former mayors Ed Hansen and Bill Moore. He later worked as chief administrative officer with the Snohomish County PUD when Hansen left the city to run the public utility. Langus’ title with Saltchuk is project manager.

Saltchuk chairman Mark Tabbutt said Langus will help assess permitting and environmental issues related to the property sale.

More in Herald Business Journal

Everett engineers learn lessons from Mexico City catastrophe

Structural scientists went to help after the September earthquake there and studied the damage.

DaVita to sell off medical groups including The Everett Clinic

Another round of health care consolidation means The Everett Clinic could soon get new ownership.

Engine trouble hits Air New Zealand’s 787 Dreamliners

A Rolls-Royce engine was shut down and was afterward found to be seriously damaged.

The Marine Corps’ version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is designed to land vertically like a helicopter. (Lockheed Martin)
F-35 fighter costs, $1 trillion over 60 years, draw scrutiny

Pentagon’s ability to repair F-35 parts at military depots is six years behind schedule.

Incidents of severe disturbances on commercial flights climb

The number of cases in which the cabin crew had to restrain a passenger rose to 169 last year.

Funko mascots Freddy Funko roll past on a conveyor belt in the Pop! Factory of the company’s new flagship store on Aug. 18, 2017. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Funko starts to bounce back after disappointing stock debut

The Everett toys-and-collectibles maker also announced the acquisition of an animation studio.

Now hiring: Younger factory workers, at Boeing and elsewhere

The company and its training partners are fighting perceptions of a dying manufacturing industry.

‘The President Stole Your Land’: Patagonia, REI blast Trump

The outdoor recreation industry is allied with Indian tribes and conservationists.

A recruiter from a driller in the shale gas industry (left), speaks with an attendee at a job fair in Cheswick, Pennsylvania, in November. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
A stronger global economy is helping boost the US job market

In November, U.S. employers added a substantial 228,000 jobs, the Labor Department says.

Most Read