FTC settles hacked home camera complaint

WASHINGTON — The government is requiring the marketer of Internet-connected home monitoring cameras to come up with a better security design after feeds from people’s homes — video from baby monitors and home security systems — were posted online for public view.

In a settlement announced Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission said lax security practices led to the breach by California-based TRENDnet.

The commission said the private lives of hundreds of consumers — video of babies sleeping in cribs, young children playing, and adults going about their daily routines — went public in January 2012 after a hacker exploited a security flaw in the company’s software and posted links of video feeds to nearly 700 cameras.

In addition to addressing software security risks, the settlement also prohibits TRENDnet from misrepresenting the security of its cameras as well as requiring the company to design a better security program.

According to the commission, the cameras had faulty software that left them open to online viewing, and in some cases listening, by anyone with the Internet address of the cameras. The complaint said the company didn’t use reasonable security to design and test its software.

TRENDnet sent user login credentials in clear, readable text over the Internet, the commission said, even though free software was available to secure those transmissions.

A request to TRENDnet for comment was not immediately answered.

More in Herald Business Journal

3 must-try doughnuts when Top Pot opens in Edmonds

After two years of work, the popular Seattle chain is opening its second Snohomish County location.

Mother-in-law homes popular after cities ease restrictions

Lynnwood and Everett are seeing a spurt of growth after changing city codes to allow for this development.

Facebook bans Trump-affiliated data firm Cambridge Analytica

The company allegedly held onto improperly obtained user data after claiming to have deleted it.

Boeing’s newest 737 Max makes first flight over Seattle

Prospects for the new aircraft — the Max 7 — are hazy, as low-cost carriers migrated to larger models.

Boeing’s an early casualty as investors dig in for trade war

The company’s share price is headed toward its biggest weekly slump in more than two years.

A niche Bothell publisher is becoming a mortgage matchmaker

Scotsman Guide has long served lending professionals. Now it’s offering information to borrowers.

Premera pledges $250M of tax cut to health coverage, charity

Cocoon House is among the beneficiaries, receiving $1.6 million from the non-profit health insurer.

Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots

Boeing predicts that the U.S. will need 117,000 new pilots by 2036.

Superstore chain Fred Meyer to stop selling guns, ammunition

Guns have been sold at nearly 45 of more than 130 stores in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska.

Most Read