Gold Bar food firm’s license suspended

A Gold Bar canning company that cans and jars products from small farms has had its food-processing license suspended after ongoing sanitation problems, according to the state Department of Agriculture.

G. Wolf Enterprises, also known as Wolf Pack Cannery at 14811 Moonlight Drive, also has violations of food-processing standards, and the management failed to cooperate with the state inspectors, according to the state agency. The company was ordered to cease all food processing operations as of Sept. 13.

In previous visits, food safety inspectors have noted violations of food processing laws and standards that included wooden storage trays that could not be properly sanitized, a lack of clear separation between processing rooms and a machine shop and mildew in a walk-in cooler.

Inspectors also found jar lids stored in open containers leaving them easily contaminated and deviations from proper canning processes that could lead to illness.

Last week, food safety officers began a routine inspection of the facility, but were unable to complete their inspection because of interference by company management, a violation of state regulations.

“At the time of the inspection, inspectors felt the threat of intimidation in their minds where they felt it was safer just to leave to the plant,” said Mike Louisell, an agriculture department spokesman. “With the passage of time, things can calm down quite a bit and we hope that’s the case.”

The agriculture department may re-instate the company’s license if the company allows the inspectors access and complies with all food processing requirements.

Representatives of Wolf Pack did not return phone calls.

The family-owned business has several dozen customers including small businesses and farms. The agriculture department would like to reach those customers who have used Wolf Pack Cannery to process their products.

Those people should contact the agriculture department’s Food Safety and Consumer Services Division at OCO@agr.wa.gov or 360-902-1942.

Food processing is a major industry in Washington with total sales reaching $15 billion in 2011, Louisell said. In Snohomish County, the industry accounted for more than $338 million in business that year, supplying more than 1,500 jobs.

More in Herald Business Journal

Everett engineers learn lessons from Mexico City catastrophe

Structural scientists went to help after the September earthquake there and studied the damage.

DaVita to sell off medical groups including The Everett Clinic

Another round of health care consolidation means The Everett Clinic could soon get new ownership.

Engine trouble hits Air New Zealand’s 787 Dreamliners

A Rolls-Royce engine was shut down and was afterward found to be seriously damaged.

Washington, Amazon sue company over seller training programs

Braintree is accused of using deceptive ads promising information on how to make money on Amazon.

The Marine Corps’ version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is designed to land vertically like a helicopter. (Lockheed Martin)
F-35 fighter costs, $1 trillion over 60 years, draw scrutiny

Pentagon’s ability to repair F-35 parts at military depots is six years behind schedule.

Incidents of severe disturbances on commercial flights climb

The number of cases in which the cabin crew had to restrain a passenger rose to 169 last year.

Funko mascots Freddy Funko roll past on a conveyor belt in the Pop! Factory of the company’s new flagship store on Aug. 18, 2017. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Funko starts to bounce back after disappointing stock debut

The Everett toys-and-collectibles maker also announced the acquisition of an animation studio.

Now hiring: Younger factory workers, at Boeing and elsewhere

The company and its training partners are fighting perceptions of a dying manufacturing industry.

‘The President Stole Your Land’: Patagonia, REI blast Trump

The outdoor recreation industry is allied with Indian tribes and conservationists.

Most Read