Graduation day for apprentice aerospace workers

The Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee (AJAC) is holding a graduation ceremony Friday evening for 21 students who have finished four-year apprenticeships to become aircraft machinists.

The graduates will get nationally recognized journey-level certificates for finishing the program. They performed 8,000 hours of supervised on-the-job training and completed high-level coursework to qualify.

They work for 10 aerospace and advanced manufacturing companies in Washington, according to an AJAC news release.

AJAC is state funded and was created in 2008 to improve training and education related to aerospace manufacturing, a major element of Washington’s economy.

It works with private partners ranging from Boeing to the Machinists union to Mukilteo-based ElectroImpact to develop apprenticeship programs, which must meet standards set by the state Apprenticeship and Training Council, according to AJAC’s website.

Friday’s event is at the Museum of Flight in Seattle.

Speakers include Jon Holden, head of International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers District Lodge 751; Kirk Adams, CEO of Seattle-based Lighthouse for the Blind, and Chandra Brown, deputy assistant secretary for manufacturing at the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Meanwhile, in May, 16 high school students fromthe Northshore and Issaquah school districts passed core certification tests in composites engineering and manufacturing at the Washington Aerospace Training and Research Center at Paine Field. The center is a key piece of Washington’s effort to train people for aerospace manufacturing.

The program required students to meet for three hours every day during the school year. It is through King County and is open to students from the Northshore, Riverview, Lake Washington, Bellevue, Mercer Island, Issaquah and Snoqualmie Valley school districts.

More in Herald Business Journal

Peoples, HomeStreet banks bump lowest salaries after tax cut

The banks with Snohomish County branches will raise minimum salaries for employees to $15 an hour.

Exotic animals find compassionate care in Bothell (video)

At the Center for Bird and Exotic Animal Medicine, vets treat snakes, hedgehogs and even kangaroos.

Don’t take economic forecasts to the bank — or the casino

Air travel delays could spur a rebirth of passenger rail service.

Amanda Strong (left) tries on an Angel of the Winds Arena hat as she and Courtney Brown hand out gift bags after the renaming ceremony Dec. 13 in Everett. The new name replaces the Xfinity name. (Andy Bronson / Her file)
Angel of the Winds to break ground on $60M casino expansion

“We think we’re on the cusp of becoming a major resort.”

In this Dec. 20, 2017, photo, a clerk reaches to a shelf to pick an item for a customer order at the Amazon Prime warehouse, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Amazon’s potential HQ2 sites leaves many cities disappointed

And yet, some municipal leaders are looking at the bright side of being rejected.

How do you retrieve an errant Boeing 737 from a muddy slope?

Turkish authorities used cranes to lift a plane that skidded off a runway.

Emirates orders 20 more Airbus A380 jumbos, saving program

The Dubai carrier also has options to buy 16 more. The program seems safe until 2029.

U.S. government proposes new rules for hog slaughter

The plan lets plant workers be in charge of removing unfit hogs, instead of government inspectors.

House passes bill aimed at lowering gender wage gap

The bill would hinder employers from retaliating against female workers who ask about others’ pay.

Most Read