Internet resources for last-minute planning

Thinking ahead may not be in your financial vocabulary. While it should be, there are resources for those who plan expensive things — retirement and education, for example — at the last minute.

Vacation planning at the last minute leads to money mistakes like overspending for flights and hotels when you ought to be checking for discounts.

This USNews.com post by Geoff Williams names the ills that overcome last-minute travelers who might have put off planning because of the expense of travel, only to pay top dollar for having waited.

“A last-minute vacation can destroy a budget, which is ironic and dispiriting if your budget is what kept you from long-range vacation planning in the first place,” he says.

Find more last-minute vacation guidance — picking “off-peak” destinations, and other shop-around advice — in this checklist at 360financialliteracy.org.

College financing at the last minute is no easy task. Still, you or your child should not be dissuaded by a perceived lack of funds. A useful post at investopedia.com suggests last-minute strategies for meeting the tuition bill. Families seeking financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid — the dreaded FAFSA — where your financial assets must be declared. But key savings, such as retirement money in a 401(k) or IRA don’t count, so you do yourself a favor, now and in the future, by shifting funds to such accounts.

Retirement saving at the last minute? Of course you should have done something earlier, but if you simply didn’t, there are things you can do, short of dumping a fortune into lottery tickets, to scramble for a modicum of retirement. Brian Perry at Bankrate.com outlines some of the steps.

For example, the Internal Revenue Service has “catch-up provisions that allow individuals over the age of 50 to contribute extra money to individual retirement accounts and 401(k)s,” Perry writes in this post. Of course, if you’re going to suddenly save like crazy, the money will have to come from somewhere, so you’ll be cutting back severely on other expenses, and you probably will have to consider that any downsizing will be permanent.

More in Herald Business Journal

Snohomish County’s campaign to land the 797 takes off

Executive Dave Somers announced the formation of a task force to urge Boeing to build the plane here.

For modern women, 98-year-old rejection letters still sting

In a stark new video, female Boeing engineers break the silence about past inopportunity.

‘Not surprising’: FCC repeals net neutrality rules

Internet service providers will be free to slow down competing services and sell faster speeds.

Disney buying large part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal

Before the buyout, 21st Century Fox will spin off the Fox network, stations and cable channels.

Commentary: GM, Boeing fight a war of words over Mars

Boeing is strongly signaling how crucial deep-space exploration is to its future.

Angel of the Winds pays $3.4M for Everett arena naming rights

The casino replaces Xfinity as the lead sponsor for the publicly owned downtown Everett events center.

Delta orders 100 Airbus A321neo jets valued at $12.7 billion

Boeing had hoped to land the deal, offering comparable 737s.

Rubio to vote against tax bill if child credit isn’t expanded

Sen. Bob Corker announced that he would vote against it due to concerns on the federal deficit.

Tulalips break ground on new Quil Ceda Creek Casino Hotel

A 150-room hotel was added to what is now a $140 million complex expected to open in spring 2019.

Most Read