Japan probe uncovers improper 787 battery wiring

TOKYO — A probe into the overheating of a lithium ion battery in an All Nippon Airways Boeing 787 that made an emergency landing found it was improperly wired, Japan’s Transport Ministry said Wednesday.

The Transport Safety Board said in a report that the battery for the aircraft’s auxiliary power unit was incorrectly connected to the main battery that overheated, although a protective valve would have prevented power from the auxiliary unit from causing damage.

Flickering of the plane’s tail and wing lights after it landed and the fact the main battery was switched off led the investigators to conclude there was an abnormal current traveling from the auxiliary power unit due to miswiring.

The agency said more analysis was needed to determine what caused the main battery to overheat and emit the smoke that prompted the Jan. 16 emergency landing of the ANA domestic flight and the worldwide grounding of Boeing 787 jets. They said they are consulting Boeing about the issue.

The Federal Aviation Administration and aviation authorities in other countries grounded 787 fleets because of the ANA incident, which followed a battery fire earlier in January in a 787 parked in Boston.

The 787, dubbed the Dreamliner by Boeing, is the first airliner to make extensive use of lithium ion batteries, which are lighter in weight, charge faster and contain more energy than conventional batteries similar in size. However, the batteries also are more prone to overheating and catching fire.

LOT Polish Airlines is losing $50,000 a day due to the grounding of its two 787s, according to government information made public on Wednesday.

LOT, a deeply indebted state-run airline, was the first European one to get the Dreamliners. Deputy Treasury Minister Rafal Baniak put total losses due to the grounded planes Wednesday at $2.5 million. The airline also is awaiting six more 787s to be delivered.

Boeing has not said how much the 787 grounding will cost it.

Imperial Capital analyst Ken Herbert estimated last week that it could cost Boeing $25 million per month in direct costs, with the total price tag climbing past $1 billion, including spending to fix the problem and expenses for delayed deliveries.

More in Herald Business Journal

Nordstrom suspends buyout after struggling to get financing

A buyout was meant to help the company continue turnaround efforts outside the glare of market scrutiny.

More self-awareness could help build a better medical system

Marcy Shimada of Edmonds Family Medicine writes the second in a series about fixing our health care system.

Justices to hear government’s email dispute with Microsoft

A lower court ruled emails in a drug case couldn’t be searched because they were in Ireland.

Bombardier said to explore options for aerospace assets

The Canadian planemaker is contending with newly imposed U.S. import duties of 300 percent.

Everett’s Access Laser sells majority stake to German company

Everett firm with 50 employees makes lasers for scientific, medical fields and self-driving vehicles

Innovation Resource Center’s advice for budding inventors

Got the next great idea? The Buildit NOW program stands ready to help you.

Mountain Pacific Bank to host Economic Forum in Everett

Mountain Pacific Bank’s Economic Forum is from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday… Continue reading

Career-community resources fair planned this week at EdCC

Edmonds Community College will host a free fall quarter career fair featuring… Continue reading

Most Read