Man gets 3 years for hacking police websites

SALT LAKE CITY — A 22-year-old Ohio man linked to the hacker collective Anonymous was sentenced Thursday to three years in federal prison for breaking into police and other websites across the country.

John Borell of Toledo pleaded guilty to computer fraud in April and agreed to pay $227,000 in damages to computer servers that had to be repaired or beefed up for security.

In early 2012, Borell attacked a server for Utahchiefs.org, a website for Syracuse, N.Y., police, the municipal website of Springfield, Mo., and a site for the Los Angeles County Police Canine Association, according to a signed plea deal.

FBI officials have said citizen complaints about drugs and other crimes were accessed along with personal data of informants and police officers.

Damage he caused put the website of Salt Lake City police out of operation for four months while a more secure site was launched.

A newlywed, Borell was given until Dec. 6 to surrender at a federal prison near his family’s home in Toledo.

Authorities have said Borell was tied to Anonymous, a loosely organized group of pranksters and activists that has targeted organizations such as MasterCard and the Church of Scientology.

During sentencing in U.S. District Court in Salt Lake City, Borell — dressed in a suit with a pink shirt — told Judge Robert J. Shelby that his marriage was going well and his wife was providing personal support. He said little else.

The judge touched on a history of Borell’s personal problems that apparently were a factor in the hackings. The defendant was ordered to accept mental health treatment and stay away from drugs. None of these issues, however, were fully explained in open court.

Outside court, Borell refused to answer any questions about his motives. He will spend three years on supervised release after prison.

“We don’t want to see you in court again,” Shelby said.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons will make the final decision on where Borell serves his sentence after he turns himself in. The judge recommended a prison in Michigan near his family home.

More in Herald Business Journal

Tesla rolls out the design for its 500-mile electric big rig

The truck will have an Autopilot system, which can maintain a set speed and slow down in traffic.

How Airbus’s A380 deal with Emirates evaporated in Dubai

It came down to concern by Emirates that Airbus might shut down the jumbo program.

Trader Joe’s recalls packaged salads over contamination fear

Turkey cranberry salads sold in Idaho, Oregon or Washington are at risk.

Equipment rental and sales business H&E opens Mukilteo shop

Company hopes to capitalize on construction occuring in northwest Washington.

New Chick-fil-A draws dozens of campers in Bothell

A second restaurant of the popular chain is opening on Thursday.

Tulalip Resort Casino to feature locally grown hazelnuts

The resort wanted to put a focus on meals created with the nut.

Alderwood Water general manager named president of state association

Alderwood Water & Wastewater District General Manager Jeff Clarke has been installed… Continue reading

Boeing earns top marks for LGBTQ workplace policies

Boeing was one of 609 businesses nationwide to earn a 100-point score… Continue reading

Aerospace workers adjust to changing industry

The number of Boeing workers dropped almost 10 percent since last year

Most Read