Mukilteo’s Electroimpact named aerospace company of the year

Mukilteo-based Electroimpact was chosen as the aerospace company of the year, the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance announced this week.

The company was hailed for its “unique style of operation, cutting edge tooling and for bringing bold ideas to fruition,” according to the aerospace alliance.

“The company has worked to improve our industry through legislation, education, training and community service. Electroimpact’s philanthropic generosity has benefitted STEM, FIRST Robotics and the aerospace industry as a whole,” according to a release from the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance.

Electroimpact makes automated assembly equipment for the aerospace industry. Its customers include Boeing, Airbus and other aerospace companies around the world. The company has more than 600 employees in the U.S. and abroad.

Peter Zieve established Electroimpact in 1986 after he earned his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington.

Electroimpact will be honored Wednesday by aerospace alliance chairman JC Hall at next week’s annual aerospace conference in Lynnwood.

The aerospace company of the year is one of five aerospace industry excellence awards given out by the aerospace alliance, which promotes the growth and success of the industry in the Northwest.

Other awards include:

• Aerospace Executive of the Year: Jon Buccola, CEO of Greenpoint Technologies, Buccola was chosen by PNAA members for his leadership of the Kirkland-based aerospace interiors company.

“His entrepreneurial vision has grown the culture into a thriving multi-company organization by adding extensive engineering, certification, manufacturing and heavy maintenance capabilities,” according to the release.

• Inspire Award: Silicon Forest Electronics, Vancouver, Wash. The company was chosen for its efforts at reaching out to local schools and assisting in developing, organizing, and participating in STEM Fest 2013, a three-day festival that gave high school students business experience using Science, Technology, Engineering and Math skills.

The aerospace alliance is also giving out two Chairman’s Awards, which recognize individuals and companies that raise the standard of the Aerospace Industry in the Pacific Northwest.

The recipients are Linda Lanham, executive director of the Aerospace Futures Alliance in Kent, and Larry Sowa, Human Strategies Consulting in Seattle.

Lanham is described as working tirelessly on behalf of the industry especially in the halls of Olympia for workforce training, transportation and creating a positive business climate for aerospace.

“Her efforts have helped secure aerospace jobs both now and in the future throughout the state of Washington,” according to the release.

Sowa is being recognized for his efforts and management of the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance scholarship program. In four years, Sowa has created a scholarship program that has provided nearly $90,000 worth of scholarships to 60 students at 10 colleges and universities.

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