Nike yanks T-shirts in aftermath of bombing

NEW YORK — Nike Inc. says it has pulled from the market T-shirts emblazoned with the words “Boston Massacre” in the aftermath of last week’s bombing during the Boston Marathon that killed three people and left dozens injured.

The athletic company, based in Portland, Ore., said Monday that it took immediate action last week to remove the products. The shirts were sold primarily at its factory store outlets.

“We conducted this process as quickly as possible and are confident the product has been removed from distribution,” Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi said in a statement emailed to The Associated Press.

The shirts, which featured blood-splattered lettering, were designed for New York Yankees fans.

The “Boston Massacre” phrase has been used to describe a pivotal late-season sweep by the Yankees of the rival Boston Red Sox in 1978. That season culminated in a World Series championship for the Yankees.

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