Nike yanks T-shirts in aftermath of bombing

NEW YORK — Nike Inc. says it has pulled from the market T-shirts emblazoned with the words “Boston Massacre” in the aftermath of last week’s bombing during the Boston Marathon that killed three people and left dozens injured.

The athletic company, based in Portland, Ore., said Monday that it took immediate action last week to remove the products. The shirts were sold primarily at its factory store outlets.

“We conducted this process as quickly as possible and are confident the product has been removed from distribution,” Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi said in a statement emailed to The Associated Press.

The shirts, which featured blood-splattered lettering, were designed for New York Yankees fans.

The “Boston Massacre” phrase has been used to describe a pivotal late-season sweep by the Yankees of the rival Boston Red Sox in 1978. That season culminated in a World Series championship for the Yankees.

More in Herald Business Journal

Will thousands of new apartments in Snohomish County mean lower rents?

Experts debate the meaning of a recent price drop, one of the biggest decreases in more than a decade.

Facebook CEO: Mistakes were made, remedies are planned

Mark Zuckerberg says Facebook has a “responsibility” to protect user data.

As expected, 92 to be laid off by Stanwood’s Twin City Foods

The frozen-vegetables processor announced last year it was moving all operations to Pasco.

Gov. Jay Inslee signs law aimed at lowering gender wage gap

The measure aims to provide equal growth opportunities and fair treatment in the workplace.

Mother-in-law homes popular after cities ease restrictions

Lynnwood and Everett are seeing a spurt of growth after changing city codes to allow for this development.

Albertsons to close one of its two Everett stores

The grocery chain says it continuously evaluates performance of stores, which means closing this one.

Boeing CEO Muilenburg’s total compensation rose to $18.5M

That’s up from just over $15 million a year earlier. It includes the value of stock awards in 2017.

Facebook data whistleblower: ‘Fake news to the next level’

Cambridge Analytica used created an information cocoon to change their perceptions, he says.

Most Read