Nike’s 4th-quarter profit tops estimates

Nike, the world’s largest sporting-goods company, posted fiscal fourth-quarter profit that topped analysts’ estimates as running shoes propelled revenue gains in the United States.

Net income in the quarter ended May 31 rose 22 percent to $668 million, or 73 cents a share, from $549 million, or 59 cents, a year earlier, Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike said Thursday in a statement. Excluding units sold, profit of 76 cents a share exceeded the 74-cent average projection compiled by Bloomberg.

Nike has been benefiting from increasing demand for running and basketball gear in North America, its largest market. In China, by contrast, consumers shunned apparel that didn’t have the right fit or sophistication, forcing Nike to use discounts. Worldwide sales gained 7.4 percent to $6.7 billion, topping estimates.

“It’s a good quarter, but not a blowout,” Chris Svezia, an analyst for Susquehanna Financial Group in New York, said in an interview. He rates the stock neutral.

Orders for the Nike brand from June to November, excluding the effects of currency exchange-rate changes, advanced 8 percent. Analysts projected a gain of 8.8 percent, the average of five estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Orders on that basis advanced 12 percent a year earlier.

The company’s business in China looks like it’s “still a work in progress,” Svezia said after orders there were little changed. “There was some hope that they were turning the corner.”

In China, which had been one of Nike’s fastest-growing markets, sales excluding currency fluctuations fell 1 percent, the third quarterly decline in a row. The company has blamed the deterioration on a slowing Chinese economy and the discounts. In May, Nike replaced its top executive in the country.

Nike has been working to improve its profitability amid higher costs for materials and labor, mostly in China. To combat that, the company increased prices last year and has been cutting waste out of its supply chain. It also sold off the under-performing Cole Haan and Umbro brands last year.

As a result, gross margin, or the percentage of sales left after subtracting the cost of goods sold, widened to 43.9 percent from 42.8 percent a year earlier. That marked the second straight gain after nine consecutive declines. The company forecast an expansion of 0.5 percentage points.

Last week Nike announced management changes that included repositioning several current executives and the retirement of Charlie Denson, its second-in-command. Denson, president of the Nike brand, is leaving July 1 after 34 years. Gary DeStefano, president of global operations and a 31-year veteran, is also retiring next month.

More in Herald Business Journal

An Alaska Airlines Embraer 175. The carrier plans to use this model on routes to and from Paine Field in Everett. (Alaska Airlines)
Alaska Airlines hopes to be a decent neighbor in Everett

Diana Birkett Rakow shared aspects of the company’s philosophy as keynote at an Economic Alliance event.

Aerospace supplier MTorres is taking off in Everett

Spanish company has received nearly $40 million in new projects since opening near Boeing in Everett.

Get ready for the era of hypersonic flight — at Mach 5

The Pentagon sees hypersonic weaponry as a potential game changer.

Safe saves Everett Office Furniture’s future after fire

The business was able to reopen because vital paperwork was preserved.

Why real estate investors are watching self-driving cars closely

With decisions on real estate made years in advance, could self-driving cars change how we live?

More than 60 Boeing 737s per month: Can suppliers keep up?

There was lots of talk this week about the prudence and pressures of soaring production rates.

Developer proposes an 18-story building in Lynnwood

It would be the second-tallest in the county and include apartments with retail space.

Snohomish County business licenses

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary… Continue reading

New Everett mayor speaks out about business in city, region

Q&A: Cassie Franklin on what can be done to get Boeing to build the 797 here and attract new industries.

Most Read