NTSB, Boeing address 787 fire; United finds wiring error

Here are new developments regarding Boeing 787 problems since this morning’s blog post:

Boeing Co. and the National Transportation Safety Board confirm that the fire that broke out yesterday on a Japan Airlines 787 has been traced to the battery used to start the aircraft’s auxiliary power unit.

In its initial report released Tuesday, the NTSB said the battery sustained “severe fire damage.”

“Thermal damage to the surrounding structure and components is confined to the area immediately near the APU battery rack (within about 20 inches) in the aft electronics bay,” NTSB writes.

The NTSB has three investigators looking into the incident. The Federal Aviation Administration, Boeing, Japan Airlines and a representative of the Japan Transport Safety Board also are investigating.

In a statement released Tuesday, Boeing says it would be premature to discuss details. However, the company said it does not think previous incidents involving 787 electrical components are related to this latest one.

“Nothing that we’ve seen in this case indicates a relationship to any previous 787 power system events, which involved power panel faults elsewhere in the aft electrical equipment bay,” Boeing said in an emailed statement.

The Wall Street Journal reports that United Airlines has found wiring problems on one of its 787s.

The airline found an improperly installed bundle of wires that connect to the APU battery, an unnamed source told the Journal.

• Also this morning, another Japan Airlines 787 had trouble in Boston. About 40 gallons of fuel leaked from the plane prior to takeoff, after it left the gate. The jet was towed back to the gate for evaluation.

The FAA previously instructed airlines to inspect 787s for fuel leaks.

• The price of a share of Boeing stock fell again Tuesday, by $2 to $74.13. That’s 2.6 percent. Yesterday after the fire was first reported, the stock fell 2 percent.

More in Herald Business Journal

Delta’s farewell tour for the Boeing 747 stops in Everett

It is the last domestic airline to retire the iconic plane. Boeing and Delta employees autographed it.

Sign of the future: Snohomish business aims to reshape industry

Manifest Signs owner thinks that smart signs is an unexplored and untapped part of his industry.

Boeing says Bombardier dumping puts 737 planes in jeopardy

“If you don’t level the playing field now, it will be too late.”

Snohomish County’s campaign to land the 797 takes off

Executive Dave Somers announced the formation of a task force to urge Boeing to build the plane here.

A decade after the recession, pain and fear linger

No matter how good things are now, it’s impossible to forget how the collapse affected people.

Panel: Motorcycle industry in deep trouble and needs help

They have failed to increase sales by making new riders out of women, minorities and millennials.

Costco rises as results display big-box retailer’s resiliency

Their model has worked in the face of heightened competition from online, brick-and-mortar peers.

Tax reform needs the public’s input on spending priorities

The GOP tax plan is a good idea, but the next step should give us a voice on how taxes are spent.

Under cloud of ethics probes, Airbus CEO Enders to step down

He leaves in 2019 after 14 years. Meanwhile, aircraft division CEO Fabrice Bregier leaves in February.

Most Read