NTSB sees no anomalies in 787 battery cells; more tests

The cause of a Jan. 7 battery fire on a Boeing 787 remains unknown Friday as officials bring in more battery experts and continue their investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board released a seventh update on its investigation into the fire last month aboard a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Logan International Airport in Boston. Boeing’s 787 has been grounded since Jan. 16.

Here’s a list of new information from the NTSB:

  • The auxiliary power unit battery was the original battery delivered with the airplane on Dec. 20, 2012. All eight battery cells came from the same manufacturing lot; the battery was installed on the aircraft Oct. 15, 2012.
  • Testing this week, which includes electrical and mass measurements and infrared thermal imaging, shows no anomalies in the individual battery cells.
  • The cells are undergoing CT scanning to examine their internal condition.
  • A battery expert from the Department of Energy joined the investigative team on Thursday to lend his expertise to the ongoing testing and validation work.
  • Next week, the NTSB battery testing team will initiate a non-invasive “soft short” test of all battery cells to find high resistance or “soft” shorts within a cell.
  • An NTSB investigator will travel to France with the battery contactor from the JAL event battery, for examination at the manufacturer. The battery contactor connects a wiring bundle from the airplane to the battery.

Meanwhile, Japan’s Civil Aviation Bureau is sending investigators to Everett — one of two sites where Boeing assembles its Dreamliner. Japan’s aviation officials are investigating a Jan. 15 battery failure aboard an All Nippon Airways 787. That aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing in Japan.

ANA, the Dreamliner’s launch customer, said yesterday that the jet’s grounding has cost it about $15.4 million in lost revenue.

More in Herald Business Journal

With surging Amazon stock, Bezos now worth more than $100B

It’s the first time anyone has crossed the $100 billion threshold since 1999.

Small retailers aim for emotional ties big chains may lack

“Put yourself into the community more and the money will come back to you.”

Plans being developed for surplus school land

Two major projects could be built on properties owned by the Edmonds School District.

Even in the Amazon era, Black Friday shows stores are alive

Industry analysts are watching how the nation’s malls fare this holiday shopping season.

Japan’s Mitsubishi Materials reports faked quality data

The company makes components used to make autos, aircraft and electricity generation equipment.

Restaurant owners finding strong appetites in Detroit

The former manufacturing and car-making city is remaking itself into a technology hub.

A look at what some stores have planned for Black Friday

With unemployment low, stores are hoping customers are in a mood to shop.

Boeing bolsters team for potential 797 with leading engineer

Terry Beezhold has been chief project engineer for the 777X program.

Uber paid off their hackers — they’re far from the only ones

“More and more companies have their own Bitcoin wallets for such cases.”

Most Read