Pilots, airline fault equipment in Asiana crash

WASHINGTON — An aviation expert familiar with the investigation into the crash of Asiana flight 214 in San Francisco in July says the pilots and the airline are raising the possibility that a malfunctioning device that controls the Boeing 777’s speed was a factor in the accident.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman has said investigators initially found no mechanical problems with the plane, but were investigating further.

According to the expert, who wasn’t authorized to talk publicly about the investigation and spoke only if not named, there have been previous incidents in which automatic throttles on some Boeing planes have disengaged for no known reason. The auto-throttle controls engine power and thus speed.

The possible equipment malfunction was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

More in Herald Business Journal

More than 60 Boeing 737s per month: Can suppliers keep up?

There was lots of talk this week about the prudence and pressures of soaring production rates.

Developer proposes an 18-story building in Lynnwood

It would be the second-tallest in the county and include apartments with retail space.

Even as stock markets shook, many investors held steady

Older investors were buying stocks, but at a lower rate than their younger counterparts.

Snohomish County business licenses

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary… Continue reading

New Everett mayor speaks out about business in city, region

Q&A: Cassie Franklin on what can be done to get Boeing to build the 797 here and attract new industries.

Aerospace analyst explains how he’ll help state’s Boeing bid

Richard Aboulafia will deliver a report on Washington’s strengths and weaknesses in landing the 797.

Air passenger traffic growing faster than airplane capacity

“Our customers are in a good place,” a Boeing marketing executive says of the airlines.

JC Penney to close store at the Cascade Mall in Burlington

Eight store closures will result in about 480 job cuts, according to CNBC.

Budget: Lockheed gets almost as much as State Department

Boeing is in second place with annual sales of $26.5 billion in 2016.

Most Read