Pot trade show coming to Everett

EVERETT — High times are ahead for Comcast Arena.

The center is hosting the U.S. Cannabis Cup, a two-day marijuana trade show, in September.

The event is expected to bring $2.3 million into Snohomish County’s economy, according to Global Spectrum, which manages the arena.

Nearly 10,000 people came to last year’s Cannabis Cup in Seattle. Vendor booths offered everything from clothing to artwork to smoking devices to grow equipment.

But the cup isn’t just about sales. It’s educational, too.

Three seminars will be held each day on topics including state regulations and political issues, as well as advice on growing marijuana and cooking with it, according to a news release from Global Spectrum.

To comply with state regulations on recreational marijuana, an outdoor private smoking area will be available for people over 21.

The event is put on by High Times, a cannabis culture magazine, and organizers have big goals for the event.

“Our aim is to showcase the businesses and the people who are stoking the fires of cannabis commerce,” according to the event’s website. “The event is a moment when we can take stock of our industry — a time to look around, exchange ideas and prepare for the future battles ahead.”

“Let’s concentrate on making Washington the marijuana powerhouse it should be,” the website says.

And business was booming in the first month of recreational sales, which began July 8. The state collected $939,883 in excise taxes and recorded $3,759,533 in total sales through Aug. 7, according to the state Liquor Control Board, which oversees legal pot.

The agency has licensed 38 stores and 155 producers and processors.

Washington voters passed Initiative 502 in 2012 to legalize marijuana for adults.

Some communities — including Everett, Lake Stevens, Arlington and Snohomish County — have adopted zoning codes to allow marijuana-based businesses. Others, including Marysville and Monroe, have prohibited such operations.

Dan Catchpole: 425-339-3454; dcatchpole@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @dcatchpole.

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