Samoa airline introduces pay-by-weight pricing

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa — A tiny Samoan airline is giving passengers a big reason to lose weight: tickets sold not by the seat, but by the kilogram.

Samoa Air planned Wednesday to start pricing its first international flights based on the weight of its passengers and their bags. Depending on the flight, each kilogram (2.2 pounds) costs 93 cents to $1.06.

That means the average American man weighing 195 pounds with a 35-pound bag would pay $97 to go one-way between Apia, Samoa, and Pago Pago, American Samoa. Competitors typically charge $130 to $140 roundtrip for similar routes.

The airline, which launched in June. has been using the pricing model since November, but in January the U.S. Department of Transportation approved its international route between American Samoa and Samoa.

The airline’s chief executive, Chris Langton, said Tuesday that “planes are run by weight and not by seat, and travelers should be educated on this important issue. The plane can only carry a certain amount of weight and that weight needs to be paid. There is no other way.”

Travelers in the region already are weighed before they fly because the planes used between the islands are small, said David Vaeafe, executive director of the American Samoa Visitors Bureau. Samoa Air’s fleet includes two nine-passenger planes for commercial routes and a three-passenger plane for an air taxi service.

Langton said passengers who need more room will be given one row on the plane to ensure comfort.

Vaeafe said the pricing system has worked in Samoa but it’s not clear whether it will be embraced by travelers in the U.S. territory.

Langton said the airline has received mixed responses since it began promoting the pricing on its website and Facebook.

Langton said some passengers have been surprised, but no one has refused to be weighed yet. He said he’s given away a few free flights to some regular customers who lost weight, and that health officials in American Samoa were among the first to contact the airline when the pricing structure was announced.

“They want to ride on the awareness this is raising and use it as a medium to address obesity issues,” he said.

More in Herald Business Journal

Aerospace workers adjust to changing industry

The number of Boeing workers dropped almost 10 percent since last year.

Tom Hoban
Are millennials warming up to life in suburbia?

They dominate the apartment market and their wants need to be accounted for, says columnist Tom Hoban.

Camano artist mixes flask, paintings for successful cocktail

Art flasks prove popular as bachelorette gifts, birthday presents and wedding favors.

Fluke’s T6 Electrical Testers receives Innovation Awards honor

Fluke’s T6 Electrical Testers have received top honors in the Tools and… Continue reading

Everett volunteer named ‘community champion’ by Molina Healthcare

Everett’s Jorge Galindo was one of seven people across the state to… Continue reading

Cascade Valley Health to hold Festival of Trees in Arlington

Cascade Valley Health Foundation will be holding their fifth annual Festival of… Continue reading

7-Eleven program helped add 500 trees, shrubs to Everett park

Last month, 7-Eleven helped plant more than 500 trees and shrubs at… Continue reading

Pentagon inspector general praises secret $80 billion bomber

US Government Accountability Office in 2016 rejected a protest filed by Boeing-Lockheed Martin.

Everett’s Sentry Credit celebrates a quarter century in business

Sentry Credit Inc. in Everett is celebrating its 25th year in business.… Continue reading

Most Read