United Airlines puts 787s in schedule for May 31

CHICAGO — United Airlines is putting the grounded Boeing 787 back in its flight schedule, even though the plane is still grounded by government authorities.

United acknowledged on Monday that the plane is in its schedule starting May 31. Travel website Jaunted.com noted a 787 flight from Houston to Denver that day.

United Continental Holdings Inc. spokeswoman Christen David says the airline will make more schedule changes as it gets a better idea of when the plane will be cleared to fly. It’s planning to resume international 787 flying June 10, from Denver to Tokyo.

Boeing Co. has proposed a fix for the 787’s smoldering batteries, but it needs approval from the Federal Aviation Administration. The fix will then have to be installed on each plane. United owns six 787s.

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