We’re committed to 777X, unions say

Six labor unions representing workers at Boeing Commercial Airplanes sent an open letter Friday to Washington elected officials and Boeing Co. executives, saying that their members are committed to building and delivering the company’s new 777X on time and on budget.

The letter is a plug for producing the planes in metro Puget Sound, where most of Boeing’s unionized employees are located. The present 777’s final assembly line is in Everett.

“Boeing has the infrastructure today. Our members have the training and experience. Together, we can put the anxiety of aerospace customers to rest for good,” the letter states. It is signed by unions representing the company’s machinists, engineers, fire fighters, security guards, maintenance workers and others, including the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) and the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA).

Where the 777X will be assembled has been the source of much speculation since Nov. 13, when members of the Machinists union rejected the company’s contract extension proposal, which would have reduced benefits in return for putting 777X assembly in Everett.

Earlier this week, Boeing CEO Jim McNerney said the company would pick a site for 777X final assembly within three months.

Alabama, California, Texas, Utah and South Carolina have been among the other possible sites mentioned in news reports.

Missouri officials are also making a pitch for the work, according to The Associated Press.

Regardless, many aerospace analysts say Everett makes overwhelming sense for the site.

The company introduced the new plane last week at the Dubai Airshow, where it announced 777X orders worth more than $95 billion at list price.

Customers have urged Boeing not to risk production delays of the sort that dogged the 787 Dreamliner, which was delivered three years late for a variety of reasons.

The company’s labor unions “are ready to answer the demand of airplane customers at the recent Dubai air show to rein in control of processes and renew focus on building the highest quality, safest and most reliable aircraft in the world,” the letter states.

Dan Catchpole: 425-339-3454; dcatchpole@heraldnet.com.

More in Herald Business Journal

Best foot forward: Ferndale company to make custom shoes easy

Long specializing in insoles, Superfeet is putting 3-D machines in stores to make customized shoes.

Port of Everett CEO Les Reardanz has been called up and will be spending much of the year away from his office. He is going to Afghanistan. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Port of Everett CEO reporting for duty — in Afghanistan

Les Reardanz has been called to active duty with the Navy for an eight-month deployment.

Alaska Airlines to announce Paine Field destinations Tuesday

The Snohomish County airport’s passenger terminal is slated to see flights this fall.

Early boarding pass: Everett’s rising passenger terminal

Here’s what to expect when two airlines begin passenger service at Paine Field later this year.

Closing of 63 Sam’s Club stores impacts small business

The retailer has historically prided itself on the services it has provided small business members.

Ford goes ‘all in’ on electric cars with $11 billion investment

That’s up from the $4.5 billion that Ford said in late 2015 it would invest through the end of the decade.

New pickups from Ram, Chevy heat up big-truck competition

Big pickup truck sales are important to automakers, which make huge profits on them.

Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data source

The sensors can also be used in office buildings to reduce energy costs and nursing homes for falls.

Most Read