7 ways Europe’s thieves prey on travelers

  • By Rick Steves
  • Friday, September 13, 2013 9:03am
  • Life

Europe is a surprisingly creative place when it comes to petty thievery and travel scams. Tourists, especially Americans, are an easy target.

Smart travelers are less likely to be victims, so be aware of these travel scams, which I’ve been tracking thanks to my readers and my European travel guides.

Rotator bluff: You’re going through a London subway turnstile and someone is pressing right behind you. You feel something in your pocket, but by the time you turn around, it’s already too late — the thief throws your wallet to his accomplice on the other side of the machines. You’re stuck on the wrong side of the turnstile, and both thieves have disappeared into the crowd.

The attractive flirt or new “friend”: You’re a single male traveler who is suddenly approached by a gorgeous woman on the street. After chatting for a while, she seductively invites you for a drink at a nearby nightclub. But when the bill arrives, it is several hundred dollars more than you expected. Only then do you notice the burly bouncers guarding the exits, so you have to pay up.

Be suspicious when invited for a drink by someone you just met; if you want to go out together, suggest a bar (or cafe) of your choosing instead.

Slow count: Cashiers who deal with lots of tourists thrive on the “slow count.” Even in banks, they’ll count your change back with odd pauses in hopes that you’ll gather up the money early and say “grazie.”

Waiters seem to be arithmetically challenged. If you have to use a large bill to make a small payment, clearly state the value of the bill as you hand it over.

Some waiters or cabbies will pretend to drop a large bill and pick up a hidden small one in order to shortchange a tourist.

Get familiar with the currency and check the change you’re given.

The well-dressed thief: The sneakiest pickpockets look like well-dressed businesspeople, generally with something official-looking in their hand.

Some pose as tourists with daypacks, cameras and even guidebooks. Don’t be fooled by looks, impressive uniforms, femme fatales or hard-luck stories.

The shell game: Avoid any gambling on the street. The classic shell game comes with a shill who wins money easily. Then it’s your turn. Believe it or not, there are enough idiots on the street to keep these con men in business.

Good luck and good love: In many countries, colorfully dressed women are notorious for aggressively approaching the unknowing tourist with friendship bracelets or sprigs of rosemary. They’ll tell you your fortune and promise you a wonderful love life.

Then they’ll demand money and refuse coins (bad luck), so the confused tourist gives paper money. This can also lead to a commotion where their children will gather around and suddenly everyone’s gone and all your zippers are down.

It’s best to just stay away from any seemingly spontaneous interaction like this on the streets.

The excuse me spill: A popular con is when someone squirts your shirt with gunk and then tells you it is bird poop. While she helps clean it up, an accomplice lifts your purse or backpack.

Wear a money belt to protect yourself against pickpockets, and leave your fancy bling at home.

Above all, enjoy your trip. Don’t travel fearfully — travel smartly.

© 2013 Rick Steves/Tribune Media Services, Inc.

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