A chicken korma that’s lighter and quicker to fix

  • By Bonnie S. Benwick The Washington Post
  • Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:20pm
  • Life

A serving of traditional chicken korma can clock in at more than 600 calories and 34 grams of fat. This version is lighter and quicker than a standard korma, yet it delivers plenty of flavor.

Serve with basmati rice.

Adapted from “Make It Lighter: Healthier Versions of Your Favorite Recipes,” by Angela Nilsen (Hamlyn, 2014).

Chicken Korma

2 medium onions

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

5 cardamom pods

1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts

1-inch piece ginger root

3 cloves garlic

2 tablespoons plus 2/3 cup water

1 3-inch cinnamon stick

2 teaspoons ground coriander

1 1/2 teaspoons garam masala

1/4 teaspoon ground mace

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2/3 cup plain low-fat yogurt, at room temperature

1/2 cup low-fat milk (2 percent)

1 or 2 small green chilies

3 tablespoons sliced almonds, for garnish

Handful cilantro tender stems and leaves, for garnish

Coarsely chop the onions.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a deep saute pan over medium-high heat. Once the oil is shimmering, add the onions and stir to coat. Cook for about 12 minutes, stirring often, until the onions are golden. Turn off the heat.

Meanwhile, remove the seeds from the cardamom pods and lightly crush them. Discard the pods.

Trim off and discard any visible fat from the chicken, then cut the meat into bite-size pieces. Peel the ginger and garlic; coarsely chop (together is OK).

Transfer one-third of the sauteed onion to a mini food processor; add the ginger, garlic and the 2 tablespoons of water; puree to a paste. (This can be done with a mortar and pestle, but it will take longer.)

Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the remaining onions in the saute pan; return to medium-high heat. Add the cardamom seeds and cinnamon stick, then the chicken. Stir-fry for 2 minutes, then add the coriander, 11/4 teaspoons of the garam masala, the mace and black pepper; stir-fry for 2 minutes.

Stir in all but 3 tablespoons of the yogurt, then the reserved onion-garlic paste. Stir-fry for 2 minutes, then add the 2/3 cup water and the milk. Once the liquid starts to bubble, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the remaining 1/4 teaspoon garam masala.

While the korma cooks, discard the seeds from the chilies, then mince the chilies and add (to taste) to the chicken korma.

Toast the almonds in a small, dry skillet over medium-low heat until fragrant and lightly browned.

Coarsely chop the cilantro and some tender stems.

Remove the korma from the heat. Discard the cinnamon stick. Divide among individual bowls; garnish with the cilantro, almonds and a dollop of the remaining yogurt. Serve warm.

Serves 4.

Nutrition Per serving: 330 calories, 43 g protein, 13 g carbohydrates, 10 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 105 mg cholesterol, 160 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar

More in Life

Wilderness boost: Why hiking does wonders for your mind and body

There is no denying how beneficial a walk through the woods can be for your overall health.

Ultimate list: Here are the top 15 beers of Snohomish County

These are the 15 the most interesting, iconic and best tasting craft beers in the county.

Two dogs await for new homes from Everett Animal Shelter

Meet Pumpkin and Lionel, two very good dogs.

New music arrivals: funk, folk, punk, hip-hop, rock and more

Chase away the clouds with some great new music.

The Subaru Crosstrek compact SUV is reborn for 2018

Now built on Subaru’s global platform, the 2018 Crosstrek has superior ride, handling and comfort.

Strasbourg: The bicultural crossroads of Europe

Fascinating history makes it one of the continent’s most intriguing cities.

Terror and bloody revolt in season two of ‘Westworld’

Now there’s a full-tilt rebellion across all sectors of the man-made park.

How to make the most of your small garden space

Containers, smart design and savvy plant choices are the key to a small garden with big impact.

Native Plant Appreciation Week is about more than smelling roses

Events set for April 22-28 celebrate the importance of Washington’s indigenous flora.

Most Read