A new life, beautiful jewelry result from her retrained brain

  • By Theresa Goffredo Herald Writer
  • Thursday, August 14, 2008 1:48pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

Ever since Anne Robinson was 14 years old, she’s had spells. Those spells have caused broken ribs, a punctured side. One time, Robinson bit through her lip. Then in 2006, she had a seizure and landed on her face on a tile floor. That fall injured her brain. The doctors told Robinson she’d never be the same again.

At the time, Robinson was a head of marketing with an accounting background, working up the corporate ladder. She was making money and zooming through life like a speeding train heading for success. But after that fateful fall, everything changed. The docs were right — Robinson wasn’t the same.

“My faith got a lot deeper and I had to readjust what was really important,” Robinson said.

Never very artistic, Robinson took up jewelry making. She had always wanted to learn but never had the time. Now, she had the time and the need: She had to re-teach her brain how to learn.

The going was slow. Robinson took a three-hour jewelry class but couldn’t absorb more than 20 minutes at a time. She’d have to repeat the class. Others could make a ring the first time they tried; Robinson would have to make the same ring 100 times before getting it right.

“I was just determined not to be stuck on stupid,” Robinson said.

Today, Robinson works in precious metal clay, which she calls the coolest thing because it’s shiny and quite malleable. She also uses natural gemstones in her jewelry. She’ll be at Fresh Paint for the second time this year and will be selling her work, priced from $12 to $595 for a necklace.

“I really do like to make everybody happy and everybody smile and I could do it with jewelry,” she said.

She’s also lucked out in another way. She once thought she was not employable, but about a year ago got an office job with Aces Four Construction in Bothell, which includes office work and taking care of the owners’ dog.

More in Life

Mukilteo’s Hani Hani scores with the police chief

The Japanese restaurant serves dishes (poke, ramen, grill) inspired by the Hawaiian islands.

‘Coco’ is another eye-popping home run for Pixar/Disney

The animated movie’s a lively, touching tale of honoring family, following dreams.

Beer of the Week: Scuttlebutt’s Barrel-aged Belgian Winter

Made in 2013, the dark strong ale was stowed away in barrels. The brewery tests one each year.

‘Love, Chaos and Dinner’ an Teatro ZinZanni’s original show

The “Parsian cabaret” is a superb circus dinner theater operation in Marymoor Park through April 29.

Heavy Hollywood headlines: Robert Horton’s movies preview

In the midst of all the sexual-misconduct allegations, the holiday film season offers some relief.

Denzel Washington’s remarkable performance isn’t helped by plot

The actor is convincing as an awkward, eccentric lawyer, but unconvincing contrivances pile up.

‘The Breadwinner’ animation is strong, but its story is stilted

The Cartoon Saloon film never lets you forget that you’re here to learn an important lesson.

Pianist Kaitlyn Gia Lee, 10, of Mill Creek, will perform Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major on Nov. 26 with the Everett Philharmonic Orchestra.
Young pianist to perform Mozart with Everett Philharmonic

Kaitlyn Gia Lee, 10, of Mill Creek, will play the piano at the Music for the Imagination concert.

Liz Oyama as Belle, Jimmi Cook as Gaston and John Han as Lefou star in the Edmonds Driftwood Players production of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” opening Nov. 24. Magic Photo
In Driftwood’s ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ Belle has girl-power bend

Edmonds Driftwood Players presents Disney’s adaptation of the fair tale Nov. 24 through Dec. 17.

Most Read