Bird updates from the PAWS campus

The wild community on the PAWS campus in Lynnwood has undergone a few changes in recent weeks. Many birds that were present during the winter, such as varied thrushes and ruby-crowned kinglets, have now moved on to their breeding grounds. Meanwhile, neo-tropical migrants like western tanagers, swainson’s thrushes and a number of warblers have been popping up on campus. Nearly all of these migrants are just stopping here on campus for a few days to refuel, and then continuing on to breed elsewhere.

Meanwhile, the breeding season for our resident wild neighbors continues apace. Having successfully fledged her young, the Anna’s hummingbird that was featured in previous Campus Updates has abandoned her first nest. She likely has begun to build a new nest elsewhere in her territory. The old nest is in the process of being recycled, although I don’t know if it is the hummingbird or some other locals that have been salvaging building materials from it.

If you would like to learn more about the work PAWS performs with sick, injured and orphaned wildlife, visit the wildlife pages of its website.

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