Book gives tips on raising ‘gender creative’ kids

  • By Leanne Italie Associated Press
  • Monday, September 30, 2013 5:50pm
  • Life

NEW YORK — For Lori Duron, parenting her younger son C.J. is etched in time as B.B. and A.B. — before Barbie and after Barbie.

The 6½-year-old discovered the doll at the back of his mother’s closet about four years ago, and she’s barely left his clutches since.

In a new book “Raising My Rainbow,” the Orange County, Calif., mom describes C.J. as — in a word — fabulous as he lives life largely in pink, playing with girl toys, dressing in girl clothes and worshipping the Disney princesses.

If you want more words, there’s “gender nonconforming, gender creative, gender fluid, gender independent, gender variant, has gender identity disorder, or whatever you prefer to call it.”

A world of nagging fear and anxiety about raising a boy who wants to be treated like a girl prompted Duron to begin an anonymous blog, RaisingMyRainbow.com.

More than a million readers later, the book from Broadway Books is her humorous coming out.

A conversation with Lori Duron:

AP: How’s C.J. doing now?

Duron: He’s getting ready to start first grade, so he’s great. He’s fun. He’s a great kid. He’s healthy and happy. C.J. could be transgender. We’ve always been open to that possibility, but right now he’s entering first grade as a boy, and he likes being a boy.

He picked out his rainbow-colored, leopard-print backpack and his pink lunch box.

AP: You’ve tapped into a burgeoning parenting “movement,” of sorts, meaning those parents who are allowing their children to be gender creative.

Duron: It has been great that we’ve met other families. That’s part of the reason why I started the blog, because we were feeling so alone, and we were feeling like we were the only family going through this, and we knew that that couldn’t be the case.

I’ve made amazing friends who are raising kind of this next generation of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning) youth, and we do consider ourselves to be in that community.

We may not always be. There’s still the possibility that C.J. could identify as straight.

AP: What are some of the fears as a “spokesparent,” with the blog and now the book?

Duron: I thought I would start this blog, and I would meet other families like ours. I never, ever intended to show my face, let people know my name.

But because of the emails and the support that I’ve received, I know it’s so important that someone needs to speak out for families like ours. I’ll be that person who speaks out. I get some hate mail, so there are people who definitely disagree.

It would be much easier not to deal with that but it’s too important for kids and families like ours.

AP: You’re not a fan of Dr. Phil. Have you ever met him?

Duron: I’ve never met him, no. He said some things that are hurtful, that could be really hurtful to kids like C.J. if parents took his advice to heart.

He said if your son is playing with girl toys redirect him toward boy toys. Redirect those feminine behaviors, to limit play things to those in line with their gender. I just think that’s so dangerous.

AP: One of the talking points in your reader’s guide at the back of the book struck me: Can you parent to the best of your ability when you’re concerned about what other people will think or say?

Duron: Yeah, that’s something that we had to deal with. It got to the point where we were putting all of these constrictions on C.J. at first, like you can play with your girl toys and put on your girl clothes at home but not in the car.

Then it was you can do it in the car but not when we get to the destination, then you could do it at this destination but not that destination.

It was making all of us a little bit crazy. No one knew where the lines had been drawn because we had drawn them so many times.

My mom finally said, “What are you guys so afraid of?” because she just saw that we were so anxious and so worried, and I just blurted out the first thing that came to my mind: “I’m afraid of what other people will think,” which is so not like me as a person in general, which is so not like me as a parent.

More in Life

Lots to see in Upper Skagit, even if the eagles are elusive

A guided hike through a mossy old-growth forest more than makes up for a lack of raptor sightings.

Shopping cart showdown: Which stores have best food prices?

Jennifer Bardsley compares Fred Meyer, PCC, QFC, Safeway, Trader Joe’s, WinCo and Whole Foods offers.

Take a closer look: Winter gardens share gifts in subtle way

Go on a neighborhood walk this month to enjoy the seasonal beauty offered by a variety of gardens.

Samish Flats in Skagit County prime turf for winter birders

This spot is great for birdwatching because of the mostly flat land, marshy areas and open water.

Outdoor classes and activities in and around Snohomish County

GET OUT Christmas bird count: Volunteers are needed for the Everett-Marysville Christmas… Continue reading

Relationship do’s and don’ts: Lessons from 40 years of marriage

Paul Schoenfeld reflects on what he’s learned about relationships after four decades with his wife.

Making it through the holidays on 4 legs and 4 wheels

1. Driving safety Here are some travel tips from the Red Cross… Continue reading

The top 10 albums of 2017: From Jay-Z to St. Vincent

This year saw an upward trend in music industry revenue due to the popularity of streaming services.

Snohomish County book calendar

Jennifer Wilhoit Noon to 1 p.m., Jan. 13, Edmonds Bookshop Wilhoit will… Continue reading

Most Read