Camouflage styles are doing anything but blending in

  • By Samantha Critchell Associated Press
  • Friday, October 4, 2013 12:35pm
  • Life

There is no hiding from camouflage.

The print that at one time was only a tool for military troops to go unnoticed has become a front-and-center look in fashion. It’s been adapted in luxe fur, sequined sweaters, athletic wear and casual kicks. It’s for girls and boys, women and men.

“The irony is that camo is anything but camouflaged right now,” said Zanna Roberts Rassi, Marie Claire’s senior fashion editor.

More utilitarian versions include vests and parkas at J. Crew and jeggings at Aeropostale. For spring, North Face has camo-inspired workout gear.

“Camo is peaking,” said Emilia Fabricant, Aeropostale’s executive vice president of design, merchandising and production. “It’s hitting everything, from sweaters to outerwear. It’s so graphic. It’s edgy but it’s also completely neutral.”

That’s the beauty of it: It dresses up, it dresses down. It is as urban or as country as you want to make it.

It’s evolved into something like the cheetah print that was, at one time, considered edgy and a little risque but is now offered in everything from sweet ballet flats to toddler clothes.

Camo retains its cool, though, especially when it’s worn with a wink, said Tom Mora, head women’s designer at J. Crew. It’s wearing the print in a feminine fabric or something like a parka over slim cargo pants and a lacy tank top or high heels, he said.

“I like the sexy take on the classic hunter look,” Mora said.

It shouldn’t be worn head-to-toe, Roberts Rassi said. The good news is that single pieces will have a long shelf life.

“This isn’t a trend for a single season,” Roberts Rassi said. “It 100 percent transcends time.”

More in Life

The “Hamilton” marquee at The Paramount in Seattle. (Andrea Brown / The Herald)
Seattle’s ‘Hamilton’ is everything it’s hyped to be and more

The blockbuster musical at The Paramount in Seattle runs through March 18.

Andrea Rosen, mother of two, quit eating sugar more than 1,000 days ago. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
How kicking her sugar habit changed a Mill Creek mom’s life

Andrea Rosen quit eating sweets 3 years ago, lost weight, felt better and her family also benefited.

Beer of the Week: Hazy IPA, 4-Ways

Four Snohomish breweries decided to brew a single malt hazy IPA made with four different hops.

Tiny book “Tonic” packed with with homeopathic remedies

Tanita de Ruijt’s recipes help support your body’s natural defences and heighten your state of mind.

Exceptional eggplant: 4 recipes with the funny-shaped veggie

By Daniel Neman / St. Louis Post-Dispatch Let’s face it, eggplant is… Continue reading

How to roast Brussels sprouts to crispy goodness

Toss these compact cabbages with toss with homemade sweet and sour vinaigrette.

Ambiguity of ‘The Invisibility Cloak’ by Ge Fei is tantalizing

The story of a man offered to build an incredible sound system delves into odd turns and noir.

These tasty enchiladas take only 5 minutes in the microwave

Serve this Mexican-inspired turkey and refried bean dish with fried corn on the side.

Peanut butter helps West African-style stew find the ‘sweet spot’

This recipe is a colorful medley of sweet potatoes, tomato, bell pepper and collard greens.

Most Read