Campfires once again allowed west of Cascades

A ban on campfires in state parks in Western Washington has been lifted, as the result of rain and forecasts of milder weather, the Washington State Parks announced Thursday.

Campers in state park campgrounds west of the Cascade crest may resume having campfires in provided campfire rings and also may use charcoal briquettes in grills and braziers.

The parks department is following the lead of Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, who announced Thursday he is lifting the ban on recreational fires in approved fire pits on forest lands under the Department of Natural Resources fire protection, within state, county and municipal or other campgrounds in Western Washington.

A ban on campfires and use of briquettes remains in place for all state parks in Eastern Washington.

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