Capitol Steps zings all sides

The totally irreverent and hilarious political comedy troupe known as Capitol Steps doesn’t spare anyone.

It doesn’t matter whether you are a Democrat or Republican or live in a blue state or a red state, Capitol Steps does not tailor its show.

“We got plenty of (President Barack) Obama and (former House Speaker) Nancy Pelosi, and we believe everyone is going to come away and feel like we got everybody,” said Elaina Newport. “It’s an equal opportunity program.”

Newport is co-founder of Capitol Steps, which began as a group of Capitol Hill Senate staffers who set out to satirize the people and places that employed them.

Today, Capitol Steps is a popular and sought after comedy troupe with many appearances on network television, many albums, and appearances four times a year on National Public Radio nationwide during their “Politics Takes a Holiday” radio specials.

Capitol Steps is stopping in Everett on its 2012 Fall Tour for one performance Wednesday at Comcast Arena.

The show is packed with puns, and includes 30 songs and skits. Audiences will hear Obama singing “If I Tax a Rich Man,” Joe Biden belting out a rock song, and Mitt Romney doing a rap number based on the song, “I Like Big Butts and I Cannot Lie.”

One of the lines from the Romney number goes like this: “I’m so rich, it makes you sick; my shoes are made from Seabiscuit.”

In addition to these routines, Newport pointed out two of her favorites from this tour.

“Greece” is based on the financial crisis in Greece and parodies the musical, “Grease.”

Another is a song tribute to Capitol Steps’ 30-year anniversary: “30 Years in Three Minutes.” It hits on a variety of topics and politicians Capitol Steps has satirized over the years from Dan Quayle to Anthony Weiner.

There are certainly no sacred cows here.

“The crazier the person, the better,” Newport said. “When I see a candidate now, I don’t wonder if he’s going to be good for the country, I look for who is funny and how easy it is to rhyme their name.”

Capitol Steps has remained so successful in part because the actors not only know politics, they hold other talents such as backgrounds in music and performance. Also, these performers maintain a critical personality trait, Newport said:

“You have to have no fear or embarrassment.”

Capitol Steps performs at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Conference Center at Comcast Arena, 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett. Tickets are $40. Go to the Comcast Arena at Everett Box Office at or charge by phone 866-332-8499. The show contains some mature content and is not recommended for children.

Theresa Goffredo: 425-339-3424;

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