Chekov, grunge highlight ACT’s calendar

  • By Theresa Goffredo Herald Writer
  • Wednesday, December 12, 2012 2:17pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

This winter and spring, ACT Theatre takes on one of Chekhov’s major works and Seattle’s female grunge scene while also taking up the issue of aging in America and the true story of the fall of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ aunt.

These and other offerings are part of ACT’s new season, which opens Jan. 4. For ticket information go to www.acttheatre.org or call 206-292-7676.

Here’s the lineup.

“14/48: The World’s Quickest Theatre Festival”: Jan. 4. Hold onto your hat because this event presented by 14/48 and the Central Heating Lab is 14 plays performed in 48 hours. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door and $10 for students.

“The Seagull”: Jan. 24. This play was a nine-month project undertaken by the company so that Chekhov’s story about the unfolding lives of 10 memorable characters would be told by a committed ensemble. Tickets are $35.

“A Day in the Death of Joe Egg”: Jan. 31. For 10 years, Brian and Sheila have laughed through their marriage and the diversity of caring for their disabled daughter until one night that changes everything. Tickets are $30, $25 and $15.

“These Streets”: Feb. 21. Seattle’s grunge era overshadowed many female singers and bands of that genre but this play tells their story with a live band and a backdrop of songs by Hammerbox, 7 Year Bitch and The Gits. Tickets are $15 to $30.

Young Playwrights Festival: March 7. This 11th annual festival showcases eight new plays by student writers ages 12 to 18. Tickets are $5 to $10.

“Project 6”: March 21. The project features works by Seattle Dance Project and Seattle based choreographer Jason Ohlberg that blends dance and theater. Tickets are $12 to $25.

“Grey Gardens”: March 16. A collaboration between ACT and The 5th Avenue Theatre that tells the story of the decline of Jackie Kennedy’s relation, Edith Bouvier Beale, and her daughter “Little Edie,” from the height of high society to the rock bottom lifestyle of hoarding junk and collecting cats. Tickets are $20 to $69

“Assisted Living”: April 19. Protagonist Joe Taylor finds his dignity and purpose after joining a group of aging hell-raisers bent on changing society’s dehumanizing attitudes toward America’s seniors. Single tickets go on sale Feb. 12.

Theresa Goffredo: 425-339-3424; goffredo@heraldnet.com.

More in Life

This beefy ex-cop has a delicate hobby: intricate paper-cut art

You can see Tom Sacco’s creations at the upcoming Everett Art Walk.

Slow-roasted vegetables make sumptuous sauce for pasta

Make the basic but good spaghetti with red sauce blissfully better with this recipe.

Mocking meatloaf: One man’s loaf is another man’s poison

Some don’t like it and some do. Here are six meatloaf recipes to try.

Roasted Brussels sprouts can be the apple of picky eater’s eye

Toasted sesame seeds and diced apple add flavors that compliment the sprouts’ earthiness.

Arlington eagle fest wants your nature-themed artwork, haiku

Local residents of an artistic bent are invited to submit… Continue reading

Hau Tran sings as Vietnamese seniors eat at Homage’s Center for Healthy Living on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 in Lynnwood, Wa. Each weekday the center offers its room for various cultures to get together for activities and lunch while speaking their native languages. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Seniors of four cultures gather for food, fitness and fun

Homage’s Center for Healthy Living offers a venue for programs in the seniors’ native languages.

Ethnic communities eagerly await Lunar New Year on Feb. 16

By Homage Senior Services Ethnic communities around the world are getting eager… Continue reading

Kia Rio subcompact takes a classy step up in 2018

A new design, roomier cabin, and better fuel economy are among the improvements on the 2018 Kia Rio.

What’s new for 2018 for travelers in Scandinavia

Sweden, Norway and Finland have embarked on many urban, cultural and transit projects.

Most Read