Chili three ways, Cincinnati style

  • By Judyrae Kruse Herald Columnist
  • Thursday, April 26, 2012 3:36pm
  • Life

If a bowlful of hot homemade chili happens to be on offer, most of us would never say no.

Especially if — or maybe even if — it’s that version called Cincinnati chili.

Not sure which applies to you? Well, thanks to Gail Fraser, here’s another chance to try this totally different from other chili also-rans. “I miss living in Cincy,” she tells us, “where one of the most popular chili parlors is Skyline Chili — little shops with steamy windows.

“Cincy chili is served on spaghetti noodles covered with cheese and a side of oyster crackers. If you have two-way chili, beans are added, and onions are added to three-way chili. Think I will make some tonight.”

Gail also says, “This recipe works best if you make it the day before to bring out the flavors, but also so you can skim the fat, as the meat is not browned before cooking. This gives it its fine texture.”

Cincinnati chili

3pounds ground beef

1can (46 ounces) tomato juice

51-inch hot red peppers

3tablespoons instant dried onions

1teaspoon garlic powder

1teaspoon ground cumin

1teaspoon paprika

1tablespoon salt

1tablespoon chili powder

½ teaspoon thyme

½ teaspoon marjoram

½ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ teaspoon allspice

¼ teaspoon leaf oregano, crushed

1quart water

12cloves

8bay leaves

½teaspoon rosemary

Spaghetti, cooked until al dente, kept warm

Grated cheese

Oyster crackers

Turn the beef, tomato juice, hot peppers, onions, seasonings and water into a large pot. Break up the meat with a whisk or large serving fork. Bring to boil, cover and simmer for 3 hours. During the last hour of cooking, put the cloves, bay leaves and rosemary in a mesh bag; add to chili and continue cooking as directed. Serve over spaghetti topped with cheese and the oyster crackers on the side.

The Forum is always happy to receive your contributions and requests, so don’t hesitate to send them along to Judyrae Kruse at the Forum, c/o The Herald, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206.

Please remember that all letters and e-mail must include a name, complete address with ZIP code and telephone number with area code. No exceptions and sorry, but no response to e-mail by return e-mail; send to kruse@heraldnet.com.

The next Forum will appear in Monday’s Good Life section.

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