Chocolate chip cookie dough in dip form

  • By J.M. Hirsch Associated Press
  • Tuesday, December 18, 2012 6:07pm
  • Life

This summer I had the misfortune to encounter the Internet culinary sensation known as cookie dough dip.

It was at a potluck party and folks were raving about this creation, which until then I’d been ignorant of. Being fans of all things cookie dough — not to mention feeling a fair degree of affection for all manner of dips — my son and I were eager to try this seemingly miraculous blend of two of nature’s most wonderful food products.

The look of betrayal on my son’s face as he put a heaping bite of it into his mouth was hilariously heartbreaking. So I tried it. He was right. This wildly popular dip is made by blending canned white beans and chocolate chips, among other unlikely ingredients. The idea is to create a healthy dip that supposedly tastes like cookie dough. It doesn’t. It’s not cute. It’s not tasty. It’s not coy. And it’s certainly not good.

So I decided to create my own version of this monstrosity. Except that my chocolate chip cookie dough dip would actually taste like chocolate chip cookie dough miraculously transformed into a dip. The result was a delicious sugar rush that begs for something crunchy and salty to dip in it.

For the cookie dough nuggets, I used a modified version of an eggless chocolate chip cookie dough recipe from Lindsay Landis’ book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook.” You could use purchased cookie dough instead, but be certain to use one that contains only pasteurized eggs.

Chocolate chip cookie dough dip

For the cookie dough:

6tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2cup packed brown sugar

1/4cup granulated sugar

1tablespoon milk or cream

1teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4teaspoon salt

1 1/4cups all-purpose flour

3/4cup mini chocolate chips

For the dip:

28-ounce packages cream cheese, softened

2cups powdered sugar

6tablespoons milk

1teaspoon almond extract

Pinch salt

1/2cup sour cream

10 Oreo (or similar) cookies, crushed

To make the cookie dough, in a large bowl use an electric mixer to beat the butter and both sugars until light and fluffy. Add the milk, vanilla and salt, then mix well. Add the flour and mix just until thoroughly blended. Mix in the chocolate chips.

Divide the mixture into chunks, about 1 teaspoon each. They don’t need to be perfectly rounded. Arrange them without touching on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet, then place in the freezer for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a food processor combine the cream cheese and powdered sugar. Process until smooth and creamy. Add the milk, almond extract, salt and sour cream, then process. Transfer to a bowl, then use a spatula or spoon to gently stir in the crushed cookies.

Once the cookie dough chunks have chilled, gently stir them into the dip. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve immediately or chill until ready to serve.

Makes 24 servings. Per serving: 240 calories; 120 calories from fat (50 percent of total calories); 13 g fat (8 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 30 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 21 g sugar; 3 g protein; 105 mg sodium

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